This blog is a place where parents and teachers of children 3-7 years of age can find information about topics specific to children in this age group, share ideas and access free resources for home and the classroom.

What Can You Eat for 100 Calories?

The 100 calorie packs available in most major food markets can be a handy way to maintain snack portion control between meals for kids and adults.

The challenge… read the nutrition label and see what the salt, fat, and carbohydrate intake is in this low calorie snack. It may be 100 calories, but it is not necessarily a healthy snack.

The site, fruits & veggies, more matters, at www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/healthy-weight-management,  issued a 100 calorie list of foods that make for healthy and low calorie snacking. Here are their suggestions:

 100 Calorie Snacks

Tortilla Chips  – 3/4 c

Strawberries –  2 cups

Sliced Peppers –  2 cups

Pretzels –  1 ounce

Muffin  – 1 ounce (1 mini)

Lettuce, shredded -20 cups

Ice Cream (not premium) 3/8 cup

Fresh Blueberries  – 1 1/4 cup

Donut 3/8 –  whole

Cucumbers, sliced  – 7 cups

Chocolate Chip Cookies – 2-2inch cookies

Cherry Tomatoes –  4 cups

Cheese P-Nut Butter Snack Cracker  – 3

Cantaloupe Cubes – 2 cups

Canned Peaches (in juice) – 1 1/2 cup

Bagel –  1/4 of 5 oz. bagel

Baby Carrots – 2 cups

Apple Slices –  2 cups

American Cheese (thin slices) -2 slices

100% Vegetable Juice -2 cups (16 fluid ounces)

100% Orange Juice – 7 fluid oz.

Happy Snacking on 100 Calories!

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Has Your Child Tried the Digital Coloring Game?

Has you child tried…My Mouse Can Color? This coloring game allows kids to use their mouse to color characters and scenes from the programs on “Can Do” Street.

My Mouse Can Color is a great game for practicing eye hand coordination.

In addition to the games on “Can Do” Street, there are 12 interactive programs your child can try that stress decision making for safety, sharing, friendship, nutrition, appropriate behavior, good eating habits and personal hygiene.

Downloads include coloring sheets and activity sheets that reinforce the program decision making content.

For teachers and parents there are activity guides ( lesson plans) for use with the programs. All “Can Do” Street games and programs are Smart Board Compatible.

Your child can start coloring by going to http://www.candostreet.com/coloring.php.

 

 

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Food Safety and Power Outages

food

When severe storms or heat waves cause power outages the big food questions are…what to save and when to throw out?

No one wants to lose a freezer and a refrigerator full of food, but spoiled food can cause serious illness.

According to the USDA Keeping Food Safe During an Emergency you need to adhere to the following guidelines:

Frozen Food

  1. A full freezer will keep temperature for about 48 hours (24 hours if half-full).
  2. If the power is going to be out for a long time, buy dry or block ice.
  3. Thawed or partially thawed food in the freezer may be safely refrozen if it still contains ice crystals or is at 40 °F or below. Partial thawing and refreezing may affect the quality of some food, but the food will be safe to eat.
  4. If you keep an appliance thermometer in your freezer, it’s easy to tell whether food is safe. When the power comes back on, check the thermometer. If it reads 40 °F or below, the food is safe and can be refrozen.

 Refrigerated Food

  Keep the fridge closed. It will keep food cold for about 4 hours. Throw away any foods that have been above 40 degrees for longer than two hours.

Words of Caution:

  • Never taste food to determine its safety! You can’t rely on appearance or odor to determine whether food is safe.

  • Always discard any items in the refrigerator and freezer that have come into contact with raw meat juices.
  • Remember, when in doubt, throw it out!

Another caution-be careful when grocery shopping after a power outage. Freezers and refrigerated foods may also have been affected.

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That First Trip to the Dentist

dentistMost of us check with our dentist as to when we need to bring our young child for his or her first dental check up.

In checking in with the American Dental Association, I found out that they recommend a young child be seen by a dentist as early as 6 to 12 months of age. Pediatric dentists also support earlier rather than later as a first visit, suggesting no later than one year of age.

The reason for an early exam…to insure that baby teeth will grow in strong and without cavities.

During the first dental visit with a Pediatric dentist, he or she will instruct parents on knowing how to brush a baby’s teeth or swab gums in a baby’s mouth, prior to the infant getting a set of teeth.

Dentists encourage preparing a child for that first visit when he or she will have a complete oral exam by:

1. Bringing a young child to the dental office before the day of an exam to familiarize him or her with the office and the people who work there.

2. Try to schedule an appointment in the morning when a child is usually rested from a night’s sleep.

3. Describe the dentist to a child as a friend whose job it is to keep his or her teeth healthy and strong and nice looking.

4. Explain what happens during an examination.

5. Speak positively about going to the dentist. Don’t look worried or concerned when you are talking about visiting the dentist.

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Kindergarten Readiness

kindergartenAccording to literature written by early childhood educators, there are steps you need to take to insure that your child is ready for kindergarten.

If you child has not attended a Pre-K program, separation anxiety may be an issue. Separating from you can be made easier by having your child spend time with other adults to get him or her used to being without you. Leaving your child with a baby sitter, or relative several times before kindergarten is due to begin may make leaving you at school less scary.

Kindergarten teachers advise making goodbyes quick, whether it is at school or at the school bus.  Know that if your child cries the teacher will know how to comfort him or her and most children stop crying once a parent is out of sight.

All children need to be able to tell the teacher when they need to use the bathroom and be able to go without adult assistance. Children cannot wear training pants, pull ups, or any kind of diapers. Children will be more comfortable if they practice in advance how to ask to use the bathroom, and how to use a bathroom equipped with multiple toilets, sinks, soap dispensers and paper towels.

In kindergarten, children are expected to socialize with other children. For some children it can be hard to do at first. Sharing toys, interacting and playing together may be new to your child. Having your child join a playgroup, or a church nursery or just going to a playground are good ways to get your child used to playing and sharing with a number of different children.

Work on tying shoe laces or have your child wear Velcro fastened shoes until they master the skill of tying laces. Have your child practice taking on and off sweaters, coats, boots and buttoning or zippering them up.

A review of basic manners such as saying please and thank you are also important preps for kindergarten. Going over personal hygiene behaviors with a child, such as coughing into a sleeve, using a tissue when sneezing, and washing hands after using the bathroom go a long way to making a child socially ready for kindergarten.

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