Posts belonging to Category Safe Kids USA



Smoke Alarms and Battery Changes

Safe Kids USA, www.safekids.org, wants to share the following message about smoke alarms.

smokeWhen it’s time to “spring forward” and change the clocks on Sunday,
March 10, make sure to change the batteries in all of your smoke alarms. If batteries were recently changed, it’s still very important to conduct your monthly test of your smoke alarms. It could save a life!

Did you know that having a working smoke alarm reduces a person’s chance of dying in a fire by half?

For the best protection, install smoke alarms on every level of your home, outside every sleeping area and in every bedroom. Smoke alarms should be mounted high on walls or ceilings and tested monthly.

It’s important to replace smoke alarm batteries at least once a year, unless they’re 10-year lithium batteries. Even if your smoke alarms are hardwired, replace the batteries in case of a chirping sound or a power outage.

Reminder: Smoke alarms do not last forever.  The maximum life span is 8-10 years.  After that time, the entire unit should be replaced. If the unit does not respond properly when tested, it should be replaced immediately.

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Facts about Kids and Sports

Safe Kids USA wants you to know the following key facts about kids and sports:

• More than 38 million children and adolescents participate in sports each year in the U.S.
• Nearly three-quarters of U.S. households with school-age children have at least one child who plays organized sports.
• Each year, more than 3.5 million children ages 14 years and under receive medical treatment for sports injuries.
• Approximately two-thirds of all sports-related injuries leading to emergency department visits are for children.
The rate and severity of sports-related injury increases with a child’s age.
• From 2001 through 2009, it is estimated that there were 1,770,000 emergency department visits, 6 percent
of these for traumatic brain injuries, among children ages 14 and under for injuries related to sports or
recreation.
• Approximately one out of five traumatic brain injuries among children are associated with participation in sports and recreational activities.
• More than 90 percent of sports-related concussions occur without the loss of consciousness.
• The most common types of sport-related injuries in children are sprains (mostly ankle), muscle strains, bone or growth plate injuries, repetitive motion injuries, and heat-related illness.
• In 2009, more than 365,000 children ages 14 and under were treated in emergency departments for either football or basketball-related injuries.

Proven Interventions that Can Protect Your Child when Playing Sports:

• Coaches should be trained in first aid and CPR, and should have a plan for responding to emergencies. Coaches should be well versed in the proper use of equipment and should enforce rules on equipment use.
• Helmets have been shown to reduce the risk of concussion, particularly in sports such as football, skiing and snowboarding.
• Children should have access to and consistently use the appropriate gear necessary for each respective sport.
• Among bicyclists, skateboarders and scooter riders, wrist guards can reduce wrist injuries by up to 87 percent, elbow pads can reduce elbow injuries by 82 percent and knee pads can reduce the number of knee injuries by 32 percent.
• Proper hydration and recognition of heat illness signs and symptoms (such as nausea, dizziness and elevated body temperature) can help reduce the risk of severe sports-related heat illness.
• The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children take at least one day off from organized
physical activity each week and at least two to three months off from a particular sport per year to avoid over training or burnout.

sports

Go to www.safekids.org for more information on keeping children safe while enjoying sports.

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