Posts Tagged ‘Willie’

Getting A Shot

Tuesday, April 19th, 2016

 Miss Pat called the class to attention after the first bell rang. Just as the “Can Dos” were coming to attention the door opened and in walked Nurse Diane.

Nurse Diane“Good morning, Miss Pat. Good morning children,” said Nurse Diane. Miss Pat greeted Nurse Diane and the “Can Dos’ all called out, “Good morning, Nurse Diane.”

Hector wasn’t really so happy to see Nurse Diane. He whispered in Willie’s ear, saying, “When Nurse Diane comes it means we have to hear medical stuff and do healthy activities like coughing in our elbows.” Willie smiled and whispered back,”Hector , you think you are so strong, but you are a baby sometimes!”

“Am not”, said Hector, “Are too” said Willie. Miss Pat called on them to share what they were talking about. “Nothing, answered Hector. Miss Pat answered. “Then talk about nothing quietly. The class laughed, and Nurse Diane began to talk about why she had come to their classroom..

 “It’s that time of year again; time to get a flu shot,” said Nurse Diane. A groan went up in the classroom. Some kids called out about how they hated getting a shot. Others shared that they were afraid of needles. Hector looked as if he didn’t feel well.

 Nurse Diane smiled and said, “Going to the doctor to get a shot doesn’t have to be scary. Here’s what you need to know about getting a shot so you can be brave at the doctor’s.

  1. Shots are just a way to make sure your body has what it needs to fight off disease and keep you healthy. The small needle puts the medicine under your skin so your body can build up strength against diseases.
  2. When the doctor or nurse sticks you with the needle it will hurt a little bit, but only for a minute and then the pain will go away.
  3. If you’re nervous about getting your shot, talk to your parents about something else. It will help keep you calm and take your mind off the shot.
  4. Smile. It’s hard to be scared or nervous if you’re smiling. So even if you’re really scared about getting the shot, just keep smiling and it will help you be brave.

The next time you go to the doctor to get a shot, you can surprise your parents and the nurses by staying calm and being brave.”

Nurse Diane  asked “Does anyone have any questions?” No one raised their hands. Hector was thinking about being brave when he got his flu shot. It sounded good when Nurse Diane said it, and after all, it would only take a minute. Hmm…it is worth a try he thought. I wouldn’t want anyone to think I was a big baby.

Source information: Kids.gov.

 

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Elves in the “Can Do” Diner Beat an Elf on a Shelf!

Wednesday, December 16th, 2015

elf

Hector brought his skateboard to a quick stop. Did he see what he thought he saw? Was that an elf? Was there more than one elf? Were there elves eating breakfast in the “Can Do” Diner?

Hector got back on his skateboard and went as fast as he could back to the diner. He peered in the diner window. He didn’t imagine it; there they were, not just one elf, but 4 elves!

Hector yelled to the other “Can Do” kids walking with Grandpa Dooley and Grandpa John to the recreation center. “Come quick! Santa’s elves are having breakfast in the diner!”

The boys all began to run. Willie yelled out as they ran,”I’m going to ask the elves to remind Santa what I want for Christmas.”

The girls walked faster, but they didn’t run; they thought that Hector might just be playing a joke on them. Grandpa Dooley and Grandpa John also picked up their pace.

Orrie, who was wheeling his chair as fast as he could, spun it around and said, “Why are the elves here? I’m sure Santa didn’t send them just to have breakfast in the diner.”  Well that did it. All the “Can Dos” stopped running and started worrying.  Nellie added, “What if they’re here to check up on us, to find out if we deserve presents?”

Grandpa John had an idea, he said, “Since Hector was the one to spot the elves, Hector can go in to the diner and invite the elves out to speak with all of you. Kids aren’t allowed in the diner without an adult, so I’ll go in with Hector. And that is just what they did. The rest of the “Can Dos” watched through the window.

Grandpa introduced himself to the elves saying, “Hi, I’m Grandpa John. Hector, who was always the first one to talk in class, and just about anywhere, was speechless!  So, Grandpa John had to introduce him. The elves looked up from their breakfasts, smiled and each elf introduced himself in turn…

“I’m Nicky.”   “I’m Ricky.”  “I’m Micky.”  “I’m Picky.”

Before he could stopped himself, Hector found his voice and said, “Picky, how did you get that name!” The other elves chuckled and Picky’s face turn beet red. “Well,” he said, “When I was a little elf, I was a picky eater. The name just stuck. Besides it’s better than my real name, which is Percivile.” Hector nodded, saying, “Picky is definitely better.”

After breakfast, the elves met with the “Can Dos.” Orrie worked up the courage to ask why the elves were in the diner. “That’s easy said Elf Micky, we were hungry.” Everyone giggled. Annie couldn’t stand it anymore and called out, “No, why did you come to “Can Do” Street? Does Santa want you to check up on us?”

The elves looked at each other, and giggled. They could see that the “Can Dos’ were worried, so Elf Ricky answered, “No, Santa already knows whose been bad or good. We’re here to make sure of the new addresses that Santa got for kids who moved to “Can Do ” Street since last Christmas. He doesn’t want to miss any children on Christmas Eve.”

The “Can Dos” looked relieved. Then Elf Nicky said, We’ve got to run; we’ve got work to do here, and then it is back to Santa’s workshop to get the toys ready for Santa’s deliveries on Christmas Eve.”

“Merry Christmas,” shouted the “Can Do” Kids.  “Merry Christmas,” answered each elf as he walked away, turned the corner, and disappeared.

 

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It’s Flag Day!

Sunday, June 14th, 2015

flag

The United States has had a flag for 238 years!

Our flag is one of our most important national symbols.

On June 14, 1777, the Second Continental Congress passed the Flag Resolution, which said that the flag would be made up of thirteen alternating red and white stripes and thirteen white, five-pointed stars on a blue field. Stars have been added to the flag as new states join the Union.

The flag has 13 horizontal stripes that stand for the 13 original colonies; seven are red, and six are white. In the upper left corner there are 50 white stars on a blue background; these stand for the 50 states in our United States. The 50-star flag we use today dates from July 4, 1960, after Hawaii became the fiftieth state, but stars were added in the past as new states joined the Union.

Images of the United States flag can be seen in many places: flying from flagpoles of public buildings, flown from private homes during Flag Day and Federal holidays such as Independence Day, and worn as a lapel pin, among many others. The flag is also referred to by other names including the Stars and Stripes, Old Glory, and the Star-Spangled Banner.

Since 1916, Flag Day in the United States has been officially celebrated on June 14. Title 4, Section 6 of the United States Code (4 U.S.C. 6) has the official information on the flag, including the standard proportions, rules to observe when displaying the flag, and how to treat this national symbol properly.

American Flag Facts and Figures:

  • When Kentucky and Vermont were admitted to the Union, the flag expanded to 15 stars and 15 stripes, but was later changed back to 13 when it became clear that adding a stripe for each state would make the flag unmanageable.
  • The official first flag to have the present design with 50 stars was flown at Fort McHenry National Monument at 12:01 a.m in Baltimore, Maryland, on July 4, 1960.

Source: Kids.gov

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The History of Mother’s Day

Wednesday, May 6th, 2015

Grandpa John walked into the kitchen while some of Orrie’s friends were having a snack; he was just in time to here Hector say, “Where did the idea for Mother’s Day come from? Orrie looked at Willie, Willie looked at Bobby and then they all looked at Grandpa John.

Grandpa John pulled up a chair, sat down and said, “Okay, this is what I know about Mother’s Day:

In seventeenth century England, Mothering Sunday was celebrated each year on the fourth Sunday of Lent (the 40 days of fasting before Easter). Christians honored the church in which they were baptized, known as their Mother Church. Mothering Sunday soon began to honor human mothers, too. British servants and employees, who worked far from home, received time off to visit their moms and share a family meal.

American colonists didn’t adopt the tradition of Mother’s Day, possibly because they were busy trying to survive in their new homes.

The idea of celebrating Mother’s Day in the U.S. began with Julia Ward Howe, who became famous during the Civil War as the author of “The Battle Hymn of the Republic.” Howe thought wars were a waste of young men’s lives, and she called on mothers to protest the killing of their children in wars.

In her Mother’s Day Proclamation, Howe wrote, “We women of one country will be too tender to those of another country to allow our sons to be trained to injure theirs.”  In the 1870s, women’s groups in over a dozen American cities observed Howe’s holiday, Mother’s Day, but the idea didn’t really catch on until the following century.

In 1908, Anna M. Jarvis campaigned for an official Mother’s Day in memory of her own mother, an activist and social worker who hoped that the contributions of mothers would someday be recognized. Anna Jarvis was determined to make her mother’s wish come true. She petitioned the superintendent of the church her mother had attended and on May 10, 1908, the first official Mother’s Day celebration took place at a church service in Grafton, West Virginia. Jarvis gave carnations—her mother’s favorite flower—to each mother at the service. Later Jarvis and her supporters lobbied for the creation of an official Mother’s Day. In 1914 her dream came true when President Wilson declared the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day.”

Grandpa John smiled and said,”That’s why every May we celebrate Mother’s Day by doing something special for our mothers. I hope you boys have something special planned for your moms and grandmas for this coming Mother’s Day!”

 Source: History4kids

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Report Cards

Friday, March 6th, 2015

All over “Can Do” Street parents were reviewing report cards as “Can Do” kids stood anxiously by waiting to hear what their parents had to say. While Orrie, Arthur Jay, Yundi, Wendy, Eulyn, and Annie didn’t have anything to worry about, others had some real worries.

Hector, Willie, and Jay got lower grades in reading and writing than they did on their last report cards. Kathy, did well in her grades for academic subjects, but didn’t do so well in the grades she got for classroom behavior.

report cardsKathy was still falling asleep in class, some days, because she didn’t eat breakfast and ran out of energy about 10 AM.

Bobby also got an unsatisfactory in classroom behavior for not paying attention when Miss Pat was teaching, and for bothering others when they were trying to pay attention.

Nellie’s problem, well, she has a hard time sharing supplies when she works on a project with others.

The next day, the class was unusually quiet. Those that didn’t do so well on their report cards were thinking about what their parents had to say, and they were worrying about what Miss Pat was going to say to their parents at the parent teacher meeting that night.

Miss Pat cleared her throat and everyone looked up from the match assignment they were doing.

“Those of you who didn’t do well in your subjects need to study more and harder. The best way to start…put away the Internet games you are so fond of and might be spending too much time on. If you are really having a problem understanding the work you are expected to docome see me, in private, and I will see that you get the extra help that you need.”

Nellie raised her hand and asked,”What if your problem is not with the subjects, but about behaving in class?” A few of the “Can Dos” nodded their heads, as if they had the same question about their report cards.

Miss Pat smiled her knowing smile and answered, “Sometimes those problems that led to receiving an unsatisfactory on our report cards are harder to fix than fixing our subject grades. First we have to admit that what we did to cause getting an unsatisfactory mark in classroom behavior; then we have to be willing to change our behavior. Then comes that hard part-trying every day to work on the behavior that is a problem.”

Miss Pat let that thought sink in for a while. She handed out some coloring pages to give the “Can Dos” a break from all their worrying. Then she called each one of the “Can Do” kids who had a problem up to her desk to meet with her privately.

She offered those with problems with reading and writing after school tutoring to help them catch up with the rest of the class.

Kathy promised to participate in the school breakfast program at school, or carry an energy bar to school, eating it on the way, or getting up earlier to eat breakfast at home.

Miss Pat gave Bobby a choice of either moving his seat away from his other classmates, so he wouldn’t bother them while they were trying to listen to Miss Pat teaching, or staying where he was and working on paying attention and allowing others to pay attention. He asked to be allowed to stay where he was, promising to pay attention.

Nellie was not sure what she should do to get better at sharing. Miss Pat suggests that Nellie allow others to take their share of the group supplies before she takes her share. Then Nellie came up with an idea, every day she would share at least one thing…a cookie, note paper, a pencil, crayons.

After everyone had met with Miss Pat, she said to the class, “I am certain that those of you who had a problem on your report cards, will do better next marking period. Those of you, who did well on your report cards, well, keep up the good work!”

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