Posts Tagged ‘Willie’

The History of Mother’s Day

Wednesday, May 6th, 2015

Grandpa John walked into the kitchen while some of Orrie’s friends were having a snack; he was just in time to here Hector say, “Where did the idea for Mother’s Day come from? Orrie looked at Willie, Willie looked at Bobby and then they all looked at Grandpa John.

Grandpa John pulled up a chair, sat down and said, “Okay, this is what I know about Mother’s Day:

In seventeenth century England, Mothering Sunday was celebrated each year on the fourth Sunday of Lent (the 40 days of fasting before Easter). Christians honored the church in which they were baptized, known as their Mother Church. Mothering Sunday soon began to honor human mothers, too. British servants and employees, who worked far from home, received time off to visit their moms and share a family meal.

American colonists didn’t adopt the tradition of Mother’s Day, possibly because they were busy trying to survive in their new homes.

The idea of celebrating Mother’s Day in the U.S. began with Julia Ward Howe, who became famous during the Civil War as the author of “The Battle Hymn of the Republic.” Howe thought wars were a waste of young men’s lives, and she called on mothers to protest the killing of their children in wars.

In her Mother’s Day Proclamation, Howe wrote, “We women of one country will be too tender to those of another country to allow our sons to be trained to injure theirs.”  In the 1870s, women’s groups in over a dozen American cities observed Howe’s holiday, Mother’s Day, but the idea didn’t really catch on until the following century.

In 1908, Anna M. Jarvis campaigned for an official Mother’s Day in memory of her own mother, an activist and social worker who hoped that the contributions of mothers would someday be recognized. Anna Jarvis was determined to make her mother’s wish come true. She petitioned the superintendent of the church her mother had attended and on May 10, 1908, the first official Mother’s Day celebration took place at a church service in Grafton, West Virginia. Jarvis gave carnations—her mother’s favorite flower—to each mother at the service. Later Jarvis and her supporters lobbied for the creation of an official Mother’s Day. In 1914 her dream came true when President Wilson declared the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day.”

Grandpa John smiled and said,”That’s why every May we celebrate Mother’s Day by doing something special for our mothers. I hope you boys have something special planned for your moms and grandmas for this coming Mother’s Day!”

 Source: History4kids

Report Cards

Friday, March 6th, 2015

All over “Can Do” Street parents were reviewing report cards as “Can Do” kids stood anxiously by waiting to hear what their parents had to say. While Orrie, Arthur Jay, Yundi, Wendy, Eulyn, and Annie didn’t have anything to worry about, others had some real worries.

Hector, Willie, and Jay got lower grades in reading and writing than they did on their last report cards. Kathy, did well in her grades for academic subjects, but didn’t do so well in the grades she got for classroom behavior.

report cardsKathy was still falling asleep in class, some days, because she didn’t eat breakfast and ran out of energy about 10 AM.

Bobby also got an unsatisfactory in classroom behavior for not paying attention when Miss Pat was teaching, and for bothering others when they were trying to pay attention.

Nellie’s problem, well, she has a hard time sharing supplies when she works on a project with others.

The next day, the class was unusually quiet. Those that didn’t do so well on their report cards were thinking about what their parents had to say, and they were worrying about what Miss Pat was going to say to their parents at the parent teacher meeting that night.

Miss Pat cleared her throat and everyone looked up from the match assignment they were doing.

“Those of you who didn’t do well in your subjects need to study more and harder. The best way to start…put away the Internet games you are so fond of and might be spending too much time on. If you are really having a problem understanding the work you are expected to docome see me, in private, and I will see that you get the extra help that you need.”

Nellie raised her hand and asked,”What if your problem is not with the subjects, but about behaving in class?” A few of the “Can Dos” nodded their heads, as if they had the same question about their report cards.

Miss Pat smiled her knowing smile and answered, “Sometimes those problems that led to receiving an unsatisfactory on our report cards are harder to fix than fixing our subject grades. First we have to admit that what we did to cause getting an unsatisfactory mark in classroom behavior; then we have to be willing to change our behavior. Then comes that hard part-trying every day to work on the behavior that is a problem.”

Miss Pat let that thought sink in for a while. She handed out some coloring pages to give the “Can Dos” a break from all their worrying. Then she called each one of the “Can Do” kids who had a problem up to her desk to meet with her privately.

She offered those with problems with reading and writing after school tutoring to help them catch up with the rest of the class.

Kathy promised to participate in the school breakfast program at school, or carry an energy bar to school, eating it on the way, or getting up earlier to eat breakfast at home.

Miss Pat gave Bobby a choice of either moving his seat away from his other classmates, so he wouldn’t bother them while they were trying to listen to Miss Pat teaching, or staying where he was and working on paying attention and allowing others to pay attention. He asked to be allowed to stay where he was, promising to pay attention.

Nellie was not sure what she should do to get better at sharing. Miss Pat suggests that Nellie allow others to take their share of the group supplies before she takes her share. Then Nellie came up with an idea, every day she would share at least one thing…a cookie, note paper, a pencil, crayons.

After everyone had met with Miss Pat, she said to the class, “I am certain that those of you who had a problem on your report cards, will do better next marking period. Those of you, who did well on your report cards, well, keep up the good work!”

Matches are for Fire not for Fun

Sunday, February 15th, 2015

Hector rang Willie’s bell. Whenever it rained or snowed, or was too cold to play outside Hector and Orrie went over to Willie’s for a play date. Willie opened the door looking like a kid who was in trouble, big time. Before Willie could say anything, Grandma Hattie called out, “Have the boys come in for milk and cookies.”

Hector and Orrie followed Willie into the kitchen where Grandma Hattie had the table set with her famous chocolate chip cookies and glasses of milk. Hector and Orrie knew something was up because Willie wasn’t making eye contact with them and he hadn’t said a word since he let them in the house.

After they gathered around the table, Grandma Hattie said, “Boys, I didn’t want you to come all this way and then turn you away without at least having  snack. Willie cannot have a play date today. He is being punished.” Willie’s head went down. Orrie looked at him sympathetically and Hector thought to himself…wow, someone else is in trouble besides me.

MATCHES

“Willie,” said Grandma Hattie,”Do you want to tell your friends why you are being punished, or shall I?” Willie answered, “I’ll tell. I did something really stupid. I played with matches and a candle in my bedroom and set the rug on fire.”

Before Hector could catch himself, he blurted out, “Wow, that was dumb. I do stupid things all the time, but I never play with matches. What were you thinking, Willie? Orrie jumped in, saying, “Hector, that’s not nice to say,. Willie feels bad enough already.”

Willie’s lower lip started trembling and a tear rolled down his face. He said,”I burnt a hole, that can’t be mended, in the rag rug that Grandma Hattie made me. I could have burnt the house down. I’m lucky the smoke detector went off and Grandma came running.

When the firemen came, they put out the fire and then they gave me a good talking to about playing with matches. Boy was I scared and ashamed and I felt so stupid!”

Hector started gobbling up cookies; he always ate when he was nervous. Orrie couldn’t finish his cookie; he always lost his appetite, even for cookies, when he was nervous.

Everyone finished their snack in silence, then Grandma Hattie said,”It’s time to go boys. Willie, please walk your friends to the door.”

On the way to the door, Hector’s curiosity got the best of him and he asked, “So, what’s your punishment for playing with matches?” Before Willie could answer, Orrie broke in, “That’s none of our business, Hector.”

When they got to the door, Willie asked them to please not tell anyone about him playing with matches. Hector and Orrie promised. “See you in school,” said Willie, “I won’t be going anywhere for awhile, not even out to play.”

On the way home, Orrie turned to Hector and said,”I am so glad Willie is okay.” “Yeah, said Hector, “I guess now he will never forget what Fireman Phil always says when he comes to class to talk about fire safety.”

They both repeated Fireman Phil’s saying, “Matches are for fire, not for fun.”

A Christmas Pageant to Remember

Sunday, December 21st, 2014

Christmas Pageant Day dawned cold but clear on “Can Do” Street.

When Willie and Nellie made their way down the stairs for breakfast, Grandma Hattie was already hard at work in the kitchen making the casserole she promised for the community center lunch following the pageant. Grandpa Dooley was busy flipping pancakes for breakfast. He knew how Willie and Nellie loved them.

Willie and Nellie ate in silence. Grandma and grandpa gave each other knowing looks. Holidays were hard for Willie and Nellie with their mom in the military. She couldn’t always get leave on the holidays to be with them.

Grandma Hattie gently reminded them that it was time to change into their costumes for the pageant at the “Can Do” Street Community Center. This year the pageant performance was ” A Christmas Carol.” Nellie had a speaking part, and so did Willie. 

Willie and Nellie nodded and got up from the table to go up stairs and dress.

A few minutes later, they came down  in their costumes. Grandma Hattie could see Nellie had tears in her eyes. She gave her a hug and Nellie said, “I wish momma could see me in the play.” Grandma nodded and said, “I know child. Your mom will be home soon, but for now you need to think about the Christmas pageant. It is almost time to leave.”

Willie and Nellie played their parts well, so well that Miss Sue called them back on stage at the end of the show to take an extra bow. Then she told them she had a surprise for them. Just as she said that, their mom popped out from behind the stage curtain. She was still in her uniform. She came right from the airport to see them in the Christmas pageant!

Everyone in the audience stood up and cheered as Willie and Nellie hugged and kissed their mom over and over again.

At lunch, following the pageant, Willie and Nellie sat on either side of their mom. After supper, Willie and Nellie, their Mom and Grandpa Dooley and Grandma Hattie helped to pack treats for the local senior residents. When they got to the senior residence, they helped distribute the gifts and sang carols with all who lived there!

It truly was a Christmas Pageant to Remember!

Don’t Hand Those Germs to Me!

Tuesday, December 9th, 2014

germsMiss Pat noticed that Hector came in from recess with dirty hands and an open snack, which he continued to eat with his dirty hands. Oh no, thought Miss Pat, all those germs going into his mouth!

Before Miss Pat could speak to him, he scooped some snack with his hands and gave it to Willie, who put it in his mouth.

UGH, thought Miss Pat. No matter how many times I talk to them about when and why it is important to wash their hands…they forget. They forget about how germs are spread.

I know, she thought, it is time to visit the US Center for Disease Control, CDC, website that has a great graphic showing children how germs are spread.

Miss Pat called the class to order and asked everyone to focus on the White Board. Then she clicked on:

Dont Hand Those Germs to Me

The “Can Dos” stared at the graphic from the CDC. They couldn’t believe their eyes! It was so easy just to hand germs to others! It was also so easy to get germs from others who did wash their hands often.

The class got quiet. Then Hector and a few others raised their hands and asked to go wash their hands.

Great, thought Miss Pat. They got the message from the CDC graphic…it is so easy to spread germs!