Posts Tagged ‘teacher pat’

A New School Year

Tuesday, September 2nd, 2014

schoolThe first day of school was warm and sunny.

For those “Can Dos” who live close enough to school to walk, it was great fun walking with friends and talking about what school was going to be like in a new grade. Of course, the moms all walked to school with the “Can Dos” but they all walked together talking about the stuff that moms talk about.

Most of the “Can Dos” carried knapsacks, which were mostly empty, except for pencils, paper, and other school supplies. On the trip home the knapsacks were sure to be heavier because they would be full of new books for Social Studies, Language Arts, Math and Computer Skills.

As they got near the school, they saw the school bus pull up, stop, and let off those “Can Dos” who live too far away from school schoolto walk. They ran up to meet their friends and then they all walked into school together.

The principal was just inside the school door; she was meeting and greeting each of the “Can Dos” and directing them to the auditorium. Once the “Can Dos” were in the auditorium, Coach Campbell gave them a big hello and led them to their seats.

The “Can Dos” listened carefully as each class was called to stand, meet their home room teacher, and walk to their new classroom. Soon it was their turn.

They were so happy to hear that Miss Pat would be their home room teacher and their computer instructor even though they would have different teachers for their other subjects.

The “Can Dos” followed Miss Pat to a sun-filled classroom with tables and chairs that were just the right size for them. There were rows of computers in the back of the room and coat closets with lots of room for boots and rain and snow gear come winter.

Then came the fun part. Miss Pat said,”When I call your name, please take the seat I assign you.” The “Can Dos” all hoped to sit next to their best friends, but Miss Pat knew better than that. Sitting next to your best friend would be too much of a temptation to talk.

Soon, everyone had his or her seat. Miss Pat welcomed everyone back to school, took attendance and gave the “Can Dos” their daily schedule of classes and the teachers who would teach them in each class. The class did not have to change rooms for each class, the teachers would come to them.

The day went by fast and soon they were on their way home talking a mile a minute about their new teachers and all the new things they would be learning.

The “Can Dos all agreed that the school year was off to a very good start!

Telling the Truth

Saturday, April 5th, 2014

Miss Pat couldn’t help but overhear one of the Can Dos saying something that wasn’t true. That was the second time this week that she had heard one of her students not tell the truth.

truthShe thought to herself…time to tell a story about what can happen if you come to be known as a kid who doesn’t tell the truth.

“Please take your seats class, said Miss Pat.  I want to tell you a story and then I am going to ask you to write a paragraph about what you learned from the story.”

The Can Dos took their seats and Miss Pat began her story.

“There once was a boy, the same age as all of you, who had a problem. His name was Jimmy and he didn’t always tell the truth.

Sometimes Jimmy told stories about his adventures with monsters and such.

If he knocked something over or dropped something, he never took the blame. He always said someone else did it, or bumped into him and made him do it.

Jimmy’s friends stopped believing what he said because they couldn’t tell when he was telling the truth or when he was making things up, exaggerating, or just plain lying. Then they stopped playing with him.

One day, Jimmy made a mistake in class and his teacher asked him to tell the true story of what happened. Jimmy told the teacher what happened, not what he wished or wanted to have happened, but what really happened.

Then his teacher smiled at him and said, “Sometimes it’s good to use our imagination, but most times people want to hear what really happened. It is important to tell the truth.”

From then on, Jimmy told the truth, no matter how hard it was to take the blame for something he did, or didn’t do. Every time he told the truth, he felt better about himself.

Soon his friends began to trust him again, and included him in games and activities.”

Miss Pat looked around the room and saw that a few of the Can Dos had faces that were red, and a few others looked a little worried. “Class,” she said, “please write a paragraph about what you learned from the story I just shared with you.”

The room got quiet as the “Can Dos’ began writing. When all the papers were in, Miss Pat allowed the Can Dos to color, while she read their paragraphs. Miss Pat was pleased to see that the class got the message of the story…it is always better to tell the truth.

What about you, boys and girls? Do you think it is always better to tell the truth?

What Would You Do If…

Sunday, February 9th, 2014

wouldMiss Pat was talking to the class about-what would you do if…

She began by talking about boys and girls and adults that care about others and their communities. She told the class that children and adults who care are practicing a behavior important to being good citizens.

To help the children understand, she asked each student to think about what he or she would do if …Why not play along with the “Can Dos” and think about what you would do.

  • A boy in the cafeteria fell.  A) Would you help him up, even if it meant losing your place on line to get food? B)  Would you hope someone else would help so you wouldn’t lose your place on line?
  •  One of your classmates has a bloody nose. A) Would you turn away because the sight of blood makes you sick? B) Would you give him or her a tissue and get the teacher’s attention?
  • You go to the movies with a few friends, one of whom uses a wheelchair. Everyone want to sit up front, but you friend has to sit in the handicapped accessible section. A) Would you sit in the wheelchair section with your friend? B) would you sit up front and tell your friend who uses a wheelchair you’ll see him after the movie because you think he is used to sitting by himself and won’t mind?
  • You borrowed your friend’s ruler; you broke it. A) Would you give it back broken and say you’re sorry? B) Would you buy a new ruler, give it to your friend and explain that you broke the ruler he gave you?
  • While you were at a friend’s house, it got cold out. Your friend gave you a jacket to wear home. On the way home, a car splashed muddy water on you and got the jacket dirty. A) Would you wash the jacket before you gave it back? B) Would you give it back dirty and explain to your friend what happened?

Why not talk about your answers about you would do with your parent or teacher?

Just for Fun

Saturday, January 18th, 2014

Miss Pat couldn’t help but notice that the “Can Do” Kids were not into vocabulary building today. They needed a fun break. How could she make vocabulary fun?

Hmmm…she thought. How about a word jumble and a word search? That ought to be more that a few minutes of fun. So she gave the “Can Dos” the following teacher printouts  to do.

Why don’t you print out these handouts and have a fun break? The fist jumble is about animals. The second images is about things we see in the spring.

fun

fun

Kids Didn’t Always Get Presents on Christmas

Sunday, December 15th, 2013

christmas presentsThe “Can Dos” were all sitting around at their classroom tables, during recess, talking about what they hoped to be getting for Christmas.

Miss Pat couldn’t help but overhear their conversations. She decided to make a history lesson out of celebrating Christmas in colonial days. She thought the class would be surprised to learn a few things about the giving and getting of presents.

Miss Pat called the class to order and said she had a story to tell them. Since the “Can Dos” love her stories, they sat quietly and listened as she began her story.

“A long time ago, before our country was a country, the first settlers celebrated Christmas very differently than we celebrate today. In some of the colonies, where our original settlers lived, they didn’t celebrate Christmas at all! In the colonies where Christmas was celebrated it was a holiday that lasted 12 days, with a big party on the last day called 12th night. The parties were mostly for adults.

Children got to participate in special meals that were eaten during the holiday time but they usually didn’t receive Christmas gifts.

In the southern part of our country, colonists made giving presents a part of the Christmas celebration when they gave gifts to servants and others who worked for them. In some southern colonies children also received gifts. It wasn’t like today though. Each child got only one gift. It was usually something practical or considered special treat that a child would enjoy. It was rarely a large gift.

As the years went on and more immigrants from different countries came to our country they brought with them their Christmas customs. One such custom that we all love is displaying and decorating  a Christmas tree. Immigrants from Germany made this custom popular in our country. Gift giving, especially gifting children, became more popular and children began to receive more than one gift in celebration of Christmas.”

The “Can Dos” all sat quietly, looking at Miss Pat, then Hector raised his hand and, when called on, said,”Boy I’m glad I didn’t live in colonial days”!

The class all agreed, thinking how lucky they are to be living now and not when kids didn’t get gifts on Christmas!