Posts Tagged ‘miss pat’

The Steps to Good Personal Hygiene

Thursday, April 30th, 2015

At the last parent-teacher meeting some of the parents asked Miss Pat if there was a computer game that could help their children practice the steps of good personal hygiene.

It seems that some of the “Can Dos” were having trouble with the steps for wash their hands and keeping themselves clean.

Miss Pat decided to make up a game, two of them to be exact.

The first game reminded the “Can Dos” of the correct steps to hand washing. The second game Miss Pat made reminded the “Can Dos” of the steps to washing and grooming.

Well, at first the “Can Dos” couldn’t see the need for the games as they all thought they knew the steps of hand washing a personal grooming. Wow, were they surprised when they didn’t do so well in the two games.

Let’s see how well you do with the “Steps” games.

Just go to the “Can Do” Club House, go to games and choose Steps.

The Alphabet Food Quiz

Monday, April 13th, 2015

“Okay, class let’s see how well you know what letters of the alphabet begin some of your favorite foods,” said Miss Pat.

alphabet“Bobby, please pass out this alphabet quiz to each of the students,” asked Miss Pat. Bobby gave each of the “Can Do” Kids a sheet of paper with a alphabet board and questions on it.

Miss Pat explained that the class was to answer all the questions. They had 20 minutes to complete the alphabet quiz.

How about taking the quiz with them?

The Alphabet Food Quiz

What meat begins with the letter H ?

What vegetable begins with the letter C

What fruit begins with the letter B?

What fish begins with the letter T?

What breakfast food begins with the letter E?

What drink begins with the letter J?

What fruit begins with the letter M?

What dairy drink begins with the letter M?

What is in salad that begins with the letter L?

What dairy begins with the letter Y?

If you eat all your dinner, what do you have as a treat that begins with the letter P?

What treat is in a cone that begins with the letter I?

What fruit begins with the letter G?

What vegetable is good mashed that begins with the letter P?

What green vegetable begins with the letter S?

What fruit is often red in color and begins with the letter A?

Most of the “Can Do” Kids got all the alphabet questions right. How did you do with the Alphabet Food Quiz?

Bobby Needs to Practice Speaking with Respect

Wednesday, March 25th, 2015

respectBobby is excited about visiting another class in school. He asks his teacher if the are going to Mary’s class.

Miss Pat, his teacher,  reminds him that we do not call teachers by their first name. Out of respect, what does Bobby need to call Mary, the teacher his class is going to visit?

Miss Mary                    Teacher Mary

Bobby plays sports. He has a coach named Ned. What should he call him?

Coach                     Mr. Ned                      Ned                     Sir

What can Bobby call men he meets in and out of school?_____________

What can Bobby call women he meets in and out of school?_________

What you would call a nurse, a doctor, a fireman, a policeman, a school crossing guard, the librarian, and the check out person in the supermarket?________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________

_________________________________________________________

Can you think of an other adults you call by a special name like aunt?

______________________________________________________

The Parade

Friday, March 13th, 2015

There was an air of excitement in the classroom. Tomorrow was the annual parade down “Can Do” Street. It wasn’t just any parade; it was the St. Patrick’s Day Parade!

paradeYundi raised his hand and asked Miss Pat why “Can Do” Street had an annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade. Miss Pat replied, “To celebrate Irish heritage.” Yundi thought for a moment and answered, “Why do we celebrate Irish heritage? Who are the Irish and where do they come from? Are there any Irish in our town?”

“That’s a lot of questions,” said Miss Pat. “Let’s look at the history of the Irish in America for those answers.”

Miss Pat began, “We honor Irish heritage and its rich culture and traditions because so many of our forefathers immigrated from Ireland, a small country in Europe, to the US from early colonial days. They came like most immigrants, for the promise of a better life.

Irish Americans, especially those who arrived in the U.S. in the 1840s, had to overcome much suffering. The Great Potato Famine of 1845-49 claimed the lives of 1 million Irish back in Ireland. To escape starvation, over 500,000 came to America. Most of the Irish who settled in the U.S., during this period, arrived with little education and few material possessions. As a result, they encountered poverty and discrimination. Most were Catholics and also suffered because of longstanding prejudices against their religion.

Irish Americans fought in the Civil War, and all the other major wars ever since. They played a large role in the growth of this nation over the years, in the building trades, law enforcement, politics, and education.

There are 34.5 million Americans who list their heritage as either primarily or partially Irish. Irish is the second-most common ancestry among Americans, falling just behind German. (US Census 2013)

Cities all over the U.S. celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with a parade and other festivities. The most famous of these annual festival traditions includes the Boston parade, with its first parade in 1737; the New York City parade, which began in 1762; and the Savannah, Georgia, parade which started in 1812.”

Miss Pat paused to let everything she said sink in. Then she asked, “Does anyone want to add anything?” All at once, Orrie, Bobby, Annie, Kathy,  and Arthur J raised their hands. Miss Pat called on Orrie, who said, “My grandma and grandpa came to “Can Do” Street, from Ireland, when they were just married.” Kathy jumped in, saying,”My grandma knows how to step dance, which is a special kind of Irish dancing that she did as a child, in Ireland.” Then it was Bobby’s turn, “I’m learning to play the bagpipe; someday I will play it in the parade.”  Arthur J shared, “I have a good voice, so I am learning to sing the Irish songs my grandparents love so much.” Annie, who had been waiting patiently burst out with, “My grandma makes the best Irish Soda bread, and I ‘m going to eat lots of it after the parade!” Everyone giggled at Annie’s comment!

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

parade

Report Cards

Friday, March 6th, 2015

All over “Can Do” Street parents were reviewing report cards as “Can Do” kids stood anxiously by waiting to hear what their parents had to say. While Orrie, Arthur Jay, Yundi, Wendy, Eulyn, and Annie didn’t have anything to worry about, others had some real worries.

Hector, Willie, and Jay got lower grades in reading and writing than they did on their last report cards. Kathy, did well in her grades for academic subjects, but didn’t do so well in the grades she got for classroom behavior.

report cardsKathy was still falling asleep in class, some days, because she didn’t eat breakfast and ran out of energy about 10 AM.

Bobby also got an unsatisfactory in classroom behavior for not paying attention when Miss Pat was teaching, and for bothering others when they were trying to pay attention.

Nellie’s problem, well, she has a hard time sharing supplies when she works on a project with others.

The next day, the class was unusually quiet. Those that didn’t do so well on their report cards were thinking about what their parents had to say, and they were worrying about what Miss Pat was going to say to their parents at the parent teacher meeting that night.

Miss Pat cleared her throat and everyone looked up from the match assignment they were doing.

“Those of you who didn’t do well in your subjects need to study more and harder. The best way to start…put away the Internet games you are so fond of and might be spending too much time on. If you are really having a problem understanding the work you are expected to docome see me, in private, and I will see that you get the extra help that you need.”

Nellie raised her hand and asked,”What if your problem is not with the subjects, but about behaving in class?” A few of the “Can Dos” nodded their heads, as if they had the same question about their report cards.

Miss Pat smiled her knowing smile and answered, “Sometimes those problems that led to receiving an unsatisfactory on our report cards are harder to fix than fixing our subject grades. First we have to admit that what we did to cause getting an unsatisfactory mark in classroom behavior; then we have to be willing to change our behavior. Then comes that hard part-trying every day to work on the behavior that is a problem.”

Miss Pat let that thought sink in for a while. She handed out some coloring pages to give the “Can Dos” a break from all their worrying. Then she called each one of the “Can Do” kids who had a problem up to her desk to meet with her privately.

She offered those with problems with reading and writing after school tutoring to help them catch up with the rest of the class.

Kathy promised to participate in the school breakfast program at school, or carry an energy bar to school, eating it on the way, or getting up earlier to eat breakfast at home.

Miss Pat gave Bobby a choice of either moving his seat away from his other classmates, so he wouldn’t bother them while they were trying to listen to Miss Pat teaching, or staying where he was and working on paying attention and allowing others to pay attention. He asked to be allowed to stay where he was, promising to pay attention.

Nellie was not sure what she should do to get better at sharing. Miss Pat suggests that Nellie allow others to take their share of the group supplies before she takes her share. Then Nellie came up with an idea, every day she would share at least one thing…a cookie, note paper, a pencil, crayons.

After everyone had met with Miss Pat, she said to the class, “I am certain that those of you who had a problem on your report cards, will do better next marking period. Those of you, who did well on your report cards, well, keep up the good work!”