Posts Tagged ‘life skills’

Bus Manners

Thursday, April 17th, 2014

busThe “Can Dos were excited to be taking a bus from their town to a neighboring town on a field trip. The “Can Dos” rarely got to ride a city bus as they either walked to school or rode the school bus.

As the “Can Dos” got on the bus, Hector took the seat behind the driver and Bobby sat alongside of him.  When Miss Sue, the camp director, got on the bus she asked Hector and Bobby to give up their seats as they were sitting in a section reserved for riders with disabilities and senior citizens. “But there isn’t anyone sitting her, said Bobby. “That doesn’t mean you should sit there, said Miss Sue. “Read what the sign says, please. “

Hector read out loud so that everyone on the bus could hear. “These seats are reserved for persons with disabilities and the elderly.”

Hector and Bobby joined the other “Can Dos “ taking seats in the middle of the bus. Hector and Bobby made it their business to watch who got on at every stop and where they sat. A lady with a walker got on and sat in the section reserved for people with disabilities. Then an elderly woman with a cane got on and sat in the same reserved section.

At the next stop two teenage boys got on the bus and plopped themselves down in the reserved section. Hector and Bobby got all upset and pointed the two teenage boys out to Miss Sue saying, “Miss Sue, make them move. They don’t belong there!”

Miss Sue smiled and said, “Wait and see what happens.” Just then a man in a wheelchair got on the bus. There was nowhere for him to sit. The teenage boys were sitting on the seats usually lifted up to make room for a wheelchair. The bus driver got up, and in a voice that could be heard  all over the bus said, “Hey there you boys, you know better than to sit there. Get up, move to the back of the bus, and make room for the man and his chair.

The boys turned beet red as everyone on the bus stared at them. They found seats in the back of the bus.

A few stops later, a woman with a preschooler and a baby in her arms got on the bus. There were no seats left; she had to stand. There was a grown man sitting right by where she was standing.  He pretended he didn’t see her, so he would not have to give up his seat. The teens in the back of the bus pretended to be sleeping.

Hector looked at Bobby, they nodded to each other, got up and walked up to the lady. Hector said, ”We have two seats a few rows back you can have. She thanked them and followed them back to where they were sitting.

All the “Can Dos” clapped for Hector and Bobby. Miss Sue gave them a big smile and said, “I am very proud of you both. You practiced good bus manners!”

Hector and Bobby beamed. Hector said, “We learned a lot about bus rules today and about being kind to people who might need extra help when riding a bus.”

Telling the Truth

Saturday, April 5th, 2014

Miss Pat couldn’t help but overhear one of the Can Dos saying something that wasn’t true. That was the second time this week that she had heard one of her students not tell the truth.

truthShe thought to herself…time to tell a story about what can happen if you come to be known as a kid who doesn’t tell the truth.

“Please take your seats class, said Miss Pat.  I want to tell you a story and then I am going to ask you to write a paragraph about what you learned from the story.”

The Can Dos took their seats and Miss Pat began her story.

“There once was a boy, the same age as all of you, who had a problem. His name was Jimmy and he didn’t always tell the truth.

Sometimes Jimmy told stories about his adventures with monsters and such.

If he knocked something over or dropped something, he never took the blame. He always said someone else did it, or bumped into him and made him do it.

Jimmy’s friends stopped believing what he said because they couldn’t tell when he was telling the truth or when he was making things up, exaggerating, or just plain lying. Then they stopped playing with him.

One day, Jimmy made a mistake in class and his teacher asked him to tell the true story of what happened. Jimmy told the teacher what happened, not what he wished or wanted to have happened, but what really happened.

Then his teacher smiled at him and said, “Sometimes it’s good to use our imagination, but most times people want to hear what really happened. It is important to tell the truth.”

From then on, Jimmy told the truth, no matter how hard it was to take the blame for something he did, or didn’t do. Every time he told the truth, he felt better about himself.

Soon his friends began to trust him again, and included him in games and activities.”

Miss Pat looked around the room and saw that a few of the Can Dos had faces that were red, and a few others looked a little worried. “Class,” she said, “please write a paragraph about what you learned from the story I just shared with you.”

The room got quiet as the “Can Dos’ began writing. When all the papers were in, Miss Pat allowed the Can Dos to color, while she read their paragraphs. Miss Pat was pleased to see that the class got the message of the story…it is always better to tell the truth.

What about you, boys and girls? Do you think it is always better to tell the truth?

Grandma Hattie Helpers

Monday, March 24th, 2014

Hattie HelpersgradeWillie and Nellie knew there was something wrong when Grandpa Dooley met them at the door. “Willie, Nellie, Grandma Hattie fell and sprained her ankle today.

She is resting in the living room,” said their grandpa. “Nellie asked,”Is she going to be okay?” Grandpa nodded ad led them into the living room.

There was Grandma Hattie, her foot propped up on a cushion, with her ankle wrapped. Nellie and Willie were careful not to touch her ankle when they hugged her.

Grandpa asked Willie and Nellie to sit down as he needed to talk with them about how they were going to have to be Grandma Hattie helpers until her ankle was better and she could walk on it again. Grandpa reminded them that he had to drive the school bus every morning and teach a music class in the afternoon. He would be out when they were getting ready for school, and would be out when they got home from school on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Willie and Nellie looked unsure, but nodded in agreement. Willie said, “I’m supposed to got to Orrie’s for a play date tomorrow. Can I still go?” Grandpa shook his head no, and told Willie he was needed around the house. Grandpa suggested that Willie call Orrie and explain why he couldn’t come over the next day.

After Willie called Orrie, grandpa sat with him and Nellie and went over their helper chores while Grandma Hattie couldn’t walk. There were beds to be made, breakfast dishes to be done, waste paper baskets and trash to be emptied, the table set and cleared and the laundry folded and put away.  Willie’s eyes got bigger and bigger with each chore grandpa named. “Wow,” he said,” that’s a lot. What are you going to be doing grandpa?” Grandpa Dooley chuckled and said,”I will clean the house, wash your clothes, iron your clothes, cook the meals, do the grocery shopping and take care of grandma.” Willie answered,”I never realized how much grandma did around here!”

As they were talking, the doorbell rang. There stood Grandma Maureen, a dinner casserole in one hand and a list in the other. In she marched, checked out Grandma Hattie, sat down and began to read from the Grandma Hattie Helpers list.

Grandma Frances, Grandma Sue and some of the ladies from the senior group would drop off dinner meals each night. Grandma Maureen would do the ironing once a week, and look in on grandma each morning when grandpa was driving the school bus and Willie and Nellie had left for school.

Some of the “Can Do Kids, who live nearby, signed up to help Willie and Nellie with their after school chores.

When Grandma Maureen finished reading from the list, Willie burst out saying,”Yeah for the Grandma Hattie helpers!”

What Do You Know About Inline Skating?

Saturday, March 8th, 2014

Coach Campbell was giving the “Can Dos’ a pop quiz about sports. They were doing fine until he asked about inline skating. So, he had the “Can Dos” take seats in the gym bleachers and he began to share what he knew.

skating“Inline skating is a form of roller skating. Skaters wear shoes with wheels set in a straight line on the bottom.

Inline skates were invented by a Minnesota hockey player so that he could skate during the off-season. California has the most inline skaters — 3.6 million residents regularly go inline skating. Many professional skiers use inline skating to train during the off-season, because some of the skills of each activity are the same.

There are several different types of inline skates, depending on the type of skating you do. Recreational skates have a plastic boot and 4 wheels. These skates are best for beginners.

No matter what kind of skates you wear, always wear a helmet, as well as wrist guards, elbow pads, and knee pads.

You can avoid getting hurt when inline skating by making sure your helmet and pads are on correctly. Your helmet should be tightly buckled, with the front coming down to right over your eyebrow, and your pads should be on tight, so they don’t slip while you are skating. It’s also important that your helmet is approved by one of the groups who test helmets to see which ones are the best: the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) or Snell B-95 standards are best for inline skating helmets.

Practice balancing on your skates by walking in them on a flat, grassy area. As you move to the pavement, balance yourself without trying to move. Gradually begin to skate by moving forward, but not too fast. Keep your knees bent and flexible when you skate — it will keep you more stable. And if you fall — fall forward. Then you will fall on your kneepads — they’re there to protect you!

If you try inline skating, make sure you are always in control of your speed, turns and stops, and be careful of cracks in the pavement where you are skating — they can be dangerous if your wheels get caught in them. It’s best to go skating out of the way of traffic and other people (skating rinks are great places to skate). As a beginner, it is best to skate with friends and family.”

Source: CDC, USA.gov

The Junior Fire Marshall Quiz by the US Fire Administration

Saturday, March 1st, 2014

Be a Junior Fire Marshall! Be safe and help your family be safe from home fires. Ask a family member to help you take this quiz from the US Fire Administration for Kids. Circle the right answer.

Quiz:

Smoke alarms need brand new batteries at least:
a. Once a month
b. Once a year
c. Once every two years
d. Once every ten years

When escaping from a fire:
a. Take time to find your favorite toys
and pets.
b. Get out fast.
c. Hide.
d. Call 9-1-1.

Heaters are hot so be sure to:
a. Ask an adult to turn them on and off for you.
b. Turn them on and off yourself.
c. Leave them on all the time.
d. Place wet clothes to dry over them.

A working smoke alarm can warn you early to escape
when a _____ happens.
a. Fire
b. Thunderstorm
c. Flood
d. Earthquake

You should plan to have __________ escape routes
from each room in your home.
a. Zero
b. One
c. Two
d. Three

Electricity can be very dangerous. Never play with:
a. A pocket video game
b. A television remote control
c. Electrical cords, outlets or wall sockets
d. A flashlight

Smoke alarm batteries need to be __________
once a month to make sure they are working.
a. Cleaned
b. Shined
c. Disconnected
d. Tested

Call 9-1-1 or the fire department only if:
a. You need a ride home from school
b. There is a scary thunderstorm
c. There is an emergency
d. You have a question about fire safety

Only ______ can use fire safely.
a. Kids
b. Kids and adults
c. Teenagers
d. Adults

If you see matches or lighters in a room:
a. throw them away
b. tell a grown-up right away
c. hide them
d. pick them up

The Junior Fire marshal quiz
answers: 1) b 2) b 3) a 4) a 5) c 6) c 7) d 8) c 9) d 10) b

Be sue to check out the US Fire Administration for kids at www.usfa.dhs.gov/kids/html/marshal/