Posts Tagged ‘kids 3-7 years’

The Lost Relay Race

Sunday, June 25th, 2017

Jay runs relay raceJay got home from visiting his grandparents just in time to be part of the annual camp relay race.

Jay was the fastest runner of all the “Can Dos.” Willie, Bobby, and Hector were so glad to see him. Jay was going to be the fourth member of the “Can Do’ Street Community Center relay race team. They really needed Jay if they were going to win the relay race. They were racing against a four-boy team from Buddiville, the next town over from “Can Do”Street.

There was a lot riding on the race.”Can Do” Street teams had won for the past four years and year five meant a cash prize of $500 to support programs at the “Can Do” Street Community Center. Willie, Bobby, Hector and Jay wanted to be able to win the prize for “Can Do” Street and for the Community Center.

Willie, Bobby and Hector met every morning for weeks before the race to practice under the watchful eye of Coach Campbell. Jay ran track each day, on the Indian reservation, while he was visiting his grandparents.

The day of the race was clear and sunny. It was not too warm. It was a good day for a race.

The stands were packed with parents and grandparents and kids from “Can Do” Street and Buddiville there to cheer on their teams.

The four-boy team from Buddiville arrived on time. The two teams met, shook hands and took their places on the track.

Hector was the first to run. He made good time in the first leg of the race. He was ahead of the boy from Buddiville when he reached the spot in the track where Bobby would take over and race the second leg of the race.

Bobby ran as fast as he could, but not fast enough to reach where Willie would take over the third leg of the race. The boy from the Buddiville team running against Bobby was really fast! Wow, could he run!  He got to his team member faster than Bobby got to Willie.

When Willie started out on the third leg of the race, the boy from Buddiville was in the lead. Try as he might, he couldn’t catch up with him and then pass him.

When Willie got to Jay, the boy from Buddiville was already way ahead. Jay ran harder and faster than he ever did before, but the boy from Buddiville was also a good runner and had a large lead over Jay to begin with.

The team from Buddiville won. Willie, Bobby, Hector and Jay felt so bad, but they practiced good sportsmanship and shook the hands of the boys from Buddiville and congratulated them on their win.

Coach Campbell followed the “Can Do” team into the locker room and had them sit down on a bench so he could speak with them .

“Did you all try your best, run your hardest, run your fastest?” Coach looked at the boys after asking his questions, waiting for them to answer.The boys all nodded yes. “Than there is nothing more you could have done,” said Coach.

“But we didn’t win,” said Hector. “Sometimes our best isn’t enough,” said Coach. “Sometimes the other team is better that us, faster than us, and they win. Sometimes we are better than the other team and we win. That’s just the way it is.”

“It hurts to lose,” said Bobby. “Yes, it does,” said Coach, “But remember, you are not losers…you lost a race, to a team that could run faster than you, that’s all. You’ve won before and you will win again.”

The boys sat quietly for awhile, letting what Coach said sink in, then they got up and followed the Coach outside to joining their family and friends for a barbeque.  To their surprise, the crowd started clapping when they saw them and yelling out, “Good race, good team work, good try.”

Willie, Hector, Bobby and Jay learned something that race day; they learned that winning isn’t always possible, but trying hard, working together and being good sports is what it is all about.

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Does Santa Snack on Soda Bread?

Friday, December 16th, 2016

soda breadEvery Christmas Eve, Grandma Maureen’s “Can Do” grandchildren are in her kitchen making soda bread for Santa. According to Grandma Maureen, “Sometimes Santa likes a break from milk and cookies.”

Kathy, Annie, Orrie, Bobby and Arthur J never get tired of hearing her tell the story of making soda bread for Santa.  She was only to happy to revisit that special time when she was a child, in Ireland, helping her mother make soda bread on Christmas Eve.

Grandma Maureen shared, “We baked the soda bread in a cast iron skillet that was too heavy for me to lift by myself.  Our cottage smelled so good and I was getting so excited about Santa coming!  When the soda bread was done, it was set to cool. A  piece was for Santa and the rest was part of Christmas breakfast for the family. Just before my bedtime, I was allowed to cut a piece  from the round loaf of soda bread and spread butter on it.

My mother and I would place the soda bread on a special plate and cover it with a linen napkin. We’d placed the plate on the mantle with a note that read, “The kettle is on the stove, the tea is in the pot, your special mug is on the table and here is your soda bread. Put you feet up and enjoy your tea and soda bread before you go out in the cold again. There is hay in the barn if the reindeer need a snack.”

Grandma Maureen’s eyes got moist as she continued,”In the morning I’d find crumbs on the plate and a few drops of tea in the mug with a note written under the bottom of mine that read, “Thanks for the snack! Look to the side of the mantle for your present.” It was signed Santa.

The “Can Do” grands did just what grandma did as a child, but since they all made a soda bread, they each left a slice for Santa and took the rest home for Christmas breakfast with their parents. Grandma reminded them that when they came for dinner the next day, to look under the tree for a gift from Santa.

Grandma Maureen said, “I know Santa will leave a present for each of you. I also know that Santa will be so pleased with the soda bread you made him!”

 

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Would you have Wanted to be a Pilgrim Child?

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2016

Pilgrim children were busy.

They did not have as much time as we do today to read or play games. Even young Pilgrim children were needed  to work their parents farms, hunt, fish and participate in the every day life of their community.

Religious activities, school and helping around the house with daily living activities also took a part of their time each week.

During what little free time they had, Pilgrim children were allowed to play games.

They probably played games with each other and their new friends, the Native America children on Thanksgiving Day.  They may have played a game called naughts and crosses, that we know as  tic, tac, toe, and  a game they called draughts that we know as checkers.

Pilgrim children may also played other games such as ball games, shooting marbles and a game similar to hide and seek, called blind man’s bluff.

One thing is for sure…Pilgrim children had to make up games since there were few toys to play with back then and it would be hundred of years before, radio, TV and computers games were invented!

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Halloween Facts!

Monday, October 17th, 2016

Here are some Halloween facts to share with your family and friends.

Halloween is a very old holiday begun about 2,000 years ago in Ireland.

Halloween was brought to North America by immigrants from Europe who celebrated the harvest around a bonfire, share ghost stories, sing, dance and tell fortunes.

There are no words in the dictionary that rhyme with orange, the color of pumpkin.

According to folklore, the Halloween jack-o-lantern got his name from a man named Jack.

Turnips and beets served as the original jack-o-lanterns.

Jack o lanterns originated in Ireland where people placed candles in hollowed-out turnips to keep away spirits and ghosts on the holiday.

Pumpkins also come in white, blue and green. Great for unique monster carvings!                                                         Halloween pumpkin

Pumpkins originated in Central America. When Europeans arrived in the New World, they found pumpkins plentiful and used in cooking by Native Americans. They took seeds back to Europe where they quickly became popular.

Growing big pumpkins is a big time hobby. Top prize money for the biggest giant pumpkin is as much as $25,000 dollars at fall festivals.

A pumpkin is a berry in the cucurbitaceae family, which also includes melons, cucumbers, squash and gourds. All these plants are native to the Americas.

Halloween is the 2nd most commercially successful holiday, with Christmas being the first. People spend as much as over $2.5 billion during Halloween on candies, costumes, decorations and parties.

Halloween candy sales average about 2 billion dollars annually in the United States.

Chocolate candy bars top the list as the most popular candy for Halloween trick-or-treaters.

It is believed that the Irish began the tradition of Trick or Treating. In preparation for All Hallow’s Eve, Irish townsfolk would visit neighbors and ask for contributions of food for a feast in the town.

The ancient Celts thought that spirits and ghosts roamed the countryside on Halloween night. They began wearing masks and costumes to avoid being recognized as human.

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