Posts Tagged ‘ice cream’

The “Can Do” Kids Eat Out

Friday, September 1st, 2017

picture of Miss Pat, Kids teacherMiss Pat couldn’t help but notice that some of the “Can Do” Kids were not using good table manners in the cafeteria.

She had money left from a class trip in May, so, she decided to take the “Can Do” Kids out to the local diner in the hopes that eating in a restaurant might help them to remember their manners, at least she hoped they would.

Before they walked to the “Can Do” Diner. Miss Pat reviewed the rules:

  • When ordering, speak clearly and politely and say please and thank you.
  • Order what you know you will eat.
  • Use your napkin to wipe your face and hands, don’t wipe your hands on your clothes.
  • No pushing or seat grabbing.
  • No throwing food, touching other kids food or using straws to blow milk at each other.

The “Can Do” Kids all agreed to mind their manners and behave. Grandma Hattie and Grandpa Dooley agreed to come along and help Miss Pat.

The walk to the restaurant went well. The “Can Do” Kids were fine sitting down. Things didn’t get tough until the menus came out and each “Can Do”had to decide what to order. Naturally most of the “Can Do” Kids wanted French fries and a soda with their meal, but Miss Pat wanted them to take a veggie and low fat milk.

Grandpa Dooley suggested a compromise. Every “Can Do” who chose a veggie over French fries and milk over soda got to have a dish of ice cream for dessert. All but one “Can Do” chose veggie’s and milk. The one who held out for French fries, was, you guessed it…Hector. So, his dessert was a small fruit salad. Miss Pat wouldn’t give in on the soda; Hector had to drink milk!

The “Can Do” Kids made Miss Pat proud;they were well behaved. Miss Pat proved to herself that the “Can Do” Kids did have table manners.

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Grandpa John and The Ice Cream Story

Friday, August 19th, 2016

Grandpa John was sweeping in front of his store when some of the “Can Do” kids were coming down the street; he couldn’t help noticing how hot and bored they looked. “Can Do” Street was in the midst of a heat wave. It was too hot to ride bikes, or play ball, or even swim in the pool, since the water was so warm it felt like taking a bath.

Grandpa John Front

Grandpa John decided the “Can Dos” need an ice cream break before they went over to Orrie’s for a play date.

When the “Can Dos” got to his store, Grandpa John invited them in for ice cream cones. When the “Can Dos” were all seated in the air-conditioned store, enjoying their ice cream, Grandpa John asked, “Who can tell me when we first began to eat ice cream in the U.S. A.? Their blank looks told him it was story time…ice cream story time.

Grandpa John cleared his throat and began talking, “Ice cream,  has a long history in the Americas. Some of my Mexican friends have told me that the Aztec emperor Moctezuma (referred to today as Montezuma) had servants climb the snow-capped volcanic mountains for snow to mix with fruit juices as a hot-weather treat.

In 1744 Barbara Janssen Bladen, daughter of Lord Baltimore and wife of Proprietary Colonial Governor of Maryland, Sir Thomas Bladen, first served ice cream in the American colonies. Ice cream, at that time, was a fashion of the rich.

The sweet treat did not become popular in this country until after the American Revolution, when the Americans had continued contact with the French.

Thomas Jefferson learned how to make ice cream during his time in Paris as the United States’ Ambassador to France. He collected many recipes while in France, but ice cream was one of his favorites. Many visitors to Monticello, Jefferson’s home in Virginia, had  ice cream during their meals there.

Americans’ love for ice cream has only increased over the years. Mary Todd Lincoln held berry parties which featured seasonal strawberries and ice cream served on the side. An American named

Abe Doumar is said to have created the first ice cream cone, on July 23, 1904, at the World’s Fair in St. Louis. When he ran out of ice cream dishes to serve his ice cream in, he served the ice cream in rolled-up thin waffles.”

By the time Grandpa John finished his ice cream story, the “Can Dos” were finished their cones and anxious to get to Orrie’s house. Grandpa John packed a cone in a freezer bag for Orrie, and gave it to Willie to carry.

As they walked to Orrie’s, Hector said, “Grandpa John has good stories for everything.” Bobby added, “Yeah, and they sound even better when you’re eating ice cream.” Everyone laughed and agreed that Grandpa John’s stories were best told with ice cream.

History of Ice Cream Source: U.S. Government Printing Office’s (GPO) Government Book Talk

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