Posts Tagged ‘Hector’

The Grandpas RememberTheir Long-ago Halloween Celebrations

Monday, October 26th, 2015

Grandpa John and Grandpa Dooley were carving pumpkins for the Halloween party at the “Can Do” Street Community Center.

They didn’t notice a few of the “Can Dos” coming into the room. They were busy talking about what Halloween was like when they were kids.

Once the “Can Dos” realized what the grandpas were talking about, they ducked behind a pile of decorations so they wouldn’t be seen, but could hear what the grandpas were saying.

“Do you remember the Halloween songs we used to sing and the poems we used to recite in the Halloween plays and skits we had in school on Halloween day,” asked Grandpa Dooley. “Hmm,” said Grandpa John, “I don’t remember any poems but I do remember a song we used to sing.”

That’s funny,” said Grandpa Dooley,”I don’t remember any songs, but I do remember a poem.”

Just as they were starting to share what they remembered, one of the “Can Dos” coughed. “Whose there,” called out Grandpa John. Hector, Willie Nellie and Annie came out from behind the pile of decorations. Grandpa Dooley asked, “Were you eavesdropping on us?” “HUH,” said Hector,”What’s that?”

Grandpa Dooley answered, “Eavesdropping is doing what you just did. It’s when you hide out so you can hear what someone is saying and they don’t know you are there.” The “Can Dos” got red in the face and looked embarrassed. Hector spoke for all of them when he said, “We’re sorry. We just wanted to hear what Halloween was like in the olden days.”

Both grandpas smiled at each other and Grandpa Dooley said, “Grandpa John, should we share the song and the poem we remember from when we were their age?”

Grandpa John said, “I’ll go first. Every Halloween we would have an all day event at school. There would be square dancing, storytelling by the teachers and the principal would give each child a small box of Halloween candies. Then certain children were called on to recite a poem or sing a song.

I sang Pumpky Pumpkin. It went like this…

The candlelight inside him makes his eyes light up and gleam; he shines right through the window at you for a happy, happy Halloween.

Oh, Pumpky Pumpkin is a happy pumpkin and do you know why, cause he’s a Jack’o Lantern instead of being a pumpkin pie.”

The “Can Dos” all clapped and asked him to sing more of the song. “Sorry,” said Grandpa John, “But that is all I remember.”

Then Grandpa Dooley recited his poem.

It must be Halloween.

“It must be Halloween, for when I passed him by

A Jack’ o Lantern smiled at me and winked his yellow eye.

He grinned with all his teeth, from high upon the shelf

I didn’t feel afraid because I’d cut him out myself.”

“Wow,” said Willie. “I guess you did have Halloween fun in the olden days!”

A message from Grandpa John and Grandpa Dooley, “Why not ask your grandparents and parents what they did on Halloween?”

Be Safe In School and Getting to and From School

Monday, September 14th, 2015

safe choices in school“Okay class,” said Miss Pat, “Let’s review making good choices to be safe both in and out of school.”

Hector looked bored and groaned. “Hector,” asked Miss Pat, “What are you groaning about? Do you know all about safe choices you need to make on the way to school and when you are in school?”

“Well Miss Pat,” answered Hector. “I don’t know everything about being safe but I know lots. I know that I’m still too young to cross the street by myself. I need an adult with me or a crossing guard to cross the street. I won’t be old enough to cross on my own until I am 10 years old.”

Miss Pat smiled, saying,”What else do you know about being safe on the way to and from school?”

Hector beamed and shared:

  • “Cross the street at corners, using traffic signals and crosswalks.
  • Never run out into the streets or cross in between parked cars.
  • If you take a school bus, make sure you always walk in front of the bus where the driver can see you.
  • Carry a flashlight at night, dawn and dusk.
  • Wear a jacket or a scarf or something that can be seen by drivers even in the dark.”

“Excellent,” said Miss Pat. “Now who wants to tell me about some choices we need to make to be safe in school?”

Maria raised her hand and when Miss Pat called on her she said, “I know how to be safe in school. You just have to remember to:

  • Walk don’t run in the hallways.
  • Wait your turn, don’t push or cut in line.”

Maria added, “No fooling around when you are going up and down the stairs. Of course there is no throwing of books, bags, supplies and no hitting.”

Then Bobby raised his hand and said, “Food fights and playing with water from the fountain are bad choices when it come to being safe. Someone could fall on a wet floor or slip on a piece of food.”

“Good Job,” said Miss Pat. “You do know how to make good choices to be safe in and out of school!

More Marbles + Cabolders!

Sunday, August 23rd, 2015

After the “Can Do” kids finished playing Marbles in the Box, Grandpa Dooley said, “OK, who’s ready to play my favorite marble game”?

Hector wasn’t so sure, since he didn’t do so well playing Marbles in the Box.” Come on Hector, said Willie. “Be a sport.” Arthur J chimed in saying, “Come on Hector we always play what you want to play. Now it’s your turn to play what we want to play.

Not wanting to be left out, Orrie said, “Hector, you don’t even know what the game is about. Maybe you will be better at this game than your were with the last game.”

Grandpa Dooley took out a really large marble; it was huge! “Does anyone know what this is called.”? The “Can Do” Kids shook their heads. “Well, continued Grandpa Dooley,  “back in the olden days, when I was young they were called caboulders, the most valuable of all the marbles, especially the ones that you could see through.

The name of the game we are going to play is Hit the Caboulder, and this is how it’s played:

marbles 1. Place a caboulder on one end of a long table, or on a flat surface on the floor

2. Stand or sit at the other end of the table, or kneel if on the ground

3. Flick the small marble with your thumb pressed against your pointer finger, or, with your pointer finger  against your thumb

4. There are no do-overs once you have flicked the marble and it is moving

5. If you miss the caboulder, you lose the marble you were shooting with

6. If you hit the caboulder but it doesn’t move, you get to keep the marble you were shooting with and go again

7. If you move the caboulder, your win 10 marbles

8. If you knock it off the table, or out of the playing area, when on the ground, you win the caboulder”!

Grandpa Dooley looked at all the eager faces and said, “Okay, what I want to know  is who is going to be the Marble Master and be in charge of the caboulder“?

The boys voted Orrie in as the Marble Master. This time when Grandpa Dooley suggested taking some practice shots, Hector was at the front of the line.

Hector didn’t win the caboulder, but he did win a few marbles!

Who won the Caboulder… no one yet; maybe next time.

Ready for Father’s Day?

Tuesday, June 2nd, 2015

Jay making something for Father's DayJay and Hector were making their way to the community center when Jay asked Hector,”What are you giving your father for Father’s Day”?

Hector looked surprised and then nervous and said, “Uh Oh…I hector needs a gift for Father's Dayneed a Father’s Day gift for my pop”! Hector thought a bit more and then said, “I need one for my grandpa too! This is going to be expensive and I don’t have any money saved and Father’s Day is the 21st of June. That’s only a few weeks away. What am I going to do”?

Take it easy, Hector”, answered Jay. “We can ask Miss Hattie, our crafts teacher, to help us make something for our dads and grandpas for Father’s Day.”

picture of grandma hattie with her hand on her hipJust then they arrived at the community center and went to see Miss Hattie, the crafts instructor. Miss Hattie listened very carefully and said, “I have just the thing you can make for your dads and grandpas for Father’s Day. Something I know they will like…a decorated picture frame with a picture of you in it.” Hector looked concerned and said, “That sounds hard to do. I don’t think I can make a picture frame.” Miss Hattie smiled and said, “I have small wooden frames in my storage closet. You can each have two. All you need to do is decorate them with different shaped  pieces of small, dried pasta and dried beans.”

Jay asked, “Can we make them now Miss Hattie? Do you have paints and glue we can use”? Miss Hattie nodded and began handing the boys the supplies they needed: 4 small picture frames (one for a grandpa and one for a dad), containers of glue, dried beans, and small, dried pieces of pasta and non-toxic paints in different colors to paint the beans and the macaroni before gluing the pieces to the frame, and of course, the paint brushes.

Jay and Hector covered the crafts table with a plastic cloth. They chose the colors they wanted to use on the pasta and the beans and began painting. When the beans and pasta pieces were dry, Jay and Hector both laid out their pasta and beans and when they were satisfied that the frames looked the way they wanted them to, Miss Hattie guided them in gluing  each  piece in place.

Once the frames were completely dry, Miss Hattie gave each of the boys a box to put the frames in and take home with them.

Each of the boys thanked Miss Hattie and started for home feeling good about the gifts they made for their dads and grandpas for Father’s Day.

The History of Mother’s Day

Wednesday, May 6th, 2015

Grandpa John walked into the kitchen while some of Orrie’s friends were having a snack; he was just in time to here Hector say, “Where did the idea for Mother’s Day come from? Orrie looked at Willie, Willie looked at Bobby and then they all looked at Grandpa John.

Grandpa John pulled up a chair, sat down and said, “Okay, this is what I know about Mother’s Day:

In seventeenth century England, Mothering Sunday was celebrated each year on the fourth Sunday of Lent (the 40 days of fasting before Easter). Christians honored the church in which they were baptized, known as their Mother Church. Mothering Sunday soon began to honor human mothers, too. British servants and employees, who worked far from home, received time off to visit their moms and share a family meal.

American colonists didn’t adopt the tradition of Mother’s Day, possibly because they were busy trying to survive in their new homes.

The idea of celebrating Mother’s Day in the U.S. began with Julia Ward Howe, who became famous during the Civil War as the author of “The Battle Hymn of the Republic.” Howe thought wars were a waste of young men’s lives, and she called on mothers to protest the killing of their children in wars.

In her Mother’s Day Proclamation, Howe wrote, “We women of one country will be too tender to those of another country to allow our sons to be trained to injure theirs.”  In the 1870s, women’s groups in over a dozen American cities observed Howe’s holiday, Mother’s Day, but the idea didn’t really catch on until the following century.

In 1908, Anna M. Jarvis campaigned for an official Mother’s Day in memory of her own mother, an activist and social worker who hoped that the contributions of mothers would someday be recognized. Anna Jarvis was determined to make her mother’s wish come true. She petitioned the superintendent of the church her mother had attended and on May 10, 1908, the first official Mother’s Day celebration took place at a church service in Grafton, West Virginia. Jarvis gave carnations—her mother’s favorite flower—to each mother at the service. Later Jarvis and her supporters lobbied for the creation of an official Mother’s Day. In 1914 her dream came true when President Wilson declared the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day.”

Grandpa John smiled and said,”That’s why every May we celebrate Mother’s Day by doing something special for our mothers. I hope you boys have something special planned for your moms and grandmas for this coming Mother’s Day!”

 Source: History4kids