Posts Tagged ‘Good Choices’

Hector Demonstrates Safety When Skateboarding and Skating

Saturday, September 17th, 2016

safetyHector is a very good skateboarder. When he is not skateboarding, he is skating. Hector always follows the safety standards for skateboarding and skating.

The first Saturday after school started, Hector helped Coach Campbell  by demonstrating good safety practices when skating and skateboarding . The safety session was held at the “Can Do” Street Recreation Center.

Coach Campbell spoke to parents and “Can Do” kids, saying, “Before you put on skates or get on a skateboard, you need to know about safety when having fun. Let’s go over what you need to know.

  • Parents, you will need to help your child replace wheels as soon as they show signs of wear, and make sure they are clean and free of debris.
  • Kids, you need to wear a properly fitting, safety-certified helmet every time you skate or use a skateboard.
  • Kids, you also need to wear elbow and knee pads, as well as wrist guards.
  • Be careful where you choose to skate and skateboard. Most accidents happen on public roads, in parking lots and on sidewalks.
  • Kids, watch other skaters, walkers, bicyclists, and cars that use the same areas where you choose to skate and skateboard.
  • Parents, please make sure your child learns the proper skating techniques. The recreation center offers a free skating class. It is a good idea for all children to learn about skating and skateboarding from those who know how to do it.”

Boys and girls at home…do you know how to skate or skateboard? Do you follow the safety rules for skating and skateboarding?

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What Do You Know About Inline Skating?

Sunday, September 11th, 2016

responsibilityCoach Campbell was giving the “Can Dos’ a pop quiz about sports. They were doing fine until he asked about inline skating. So, he had the “Can Dos” take seats in the gym bleachers and he began to share what he knew.

“Inline skating is a form of roller skating. Skaters wear shoes with wheels set in a straight line on the bottom.

Inline skates were invented by a Minnesota hockey player so that he could skate during the off-season. California has the most inline skaters — 3.6 million residents regularly go inline skating. Many professional skiers use inline skating to train during the off-season, because some of the skills of each activity are the same.

There are several different types of inline skates, depending on the type of skating you do. Recreational skates have a plastic boot and 4 wheels. These skates are best for beginners.

No matter what kind of skates you wear, always wear a helmet, as well as wrist guards, elbow pads, and knee pads.

You can avoid getting hurt when inline skating by making sure your helmet and pads are on correctly. Your helmet should be tightly buckled, with the front coming down to right over your eyebrow, and your pads should be on tight, so they don’t slip while you are skating. It’s also important that your helmet is approved by one of the groups who test helmets to see which ones are the best: the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) or Snell B-95 standards are best for inline skating helmets.

Practice balancing on your skates by walking in them on a flat, grassy area. As you move to the pavement, balance yourself without trying to move. Gradually begin to skate by moving forward, but not too fast. Keep your knees bent and flexible when you skate — it will keep you more stable. And if you fall — fall forward. Then you will fall on your kneepads — they’re there to protect you!

If you try inline skating, make sure you are always in control of your speed, turns and stops, and be careful of cracks in the pavement where you are skating — they can be dangerous if your wheels get caught in them. It’s best to go skating out of the way of traffic and other people (skating rinks are great places to skate). As a beginner, it is best to skate with friends and family.”

Source: CDC, USA.gov

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A New School Year

Sunday, September 4th, 2016

schoolThe first day of school was warm and sunny.

For those “Can Dos” who live close enough to school to walk, it was great fun walking with friends and talking about what school was going to be like in a new grade. Of course, the moms all walked to school with the “Can Dos” but they all walked together talking about the stuff that moms talk about.

Most of the “Can Dos” carried knapsacks, which were mostly empty, except for pencils, paper, and other school supplies. On the trip home the knapsacks were sure to be heavier because they would be full of new books for Social Studies, Language Arts, Math and Computer Skills.

As they got near the school, they saw the school bus pull up, stop, and let off those “Can Dos” who live too far away from school schoolto walk. They ran up to meet their friends and then they all walked into school together.

The principal was just inside the school door; she was meeting and greeting each of the “Can Dos” and directing them to the auditorium. Once the “Can Dos” were in the auditorium, Coach Campbell gave them a big hello and led them to their seats.

The “Can Dos” listened carefully as each class was called to stand, meet their home room teacher, and walk to their new classroom. Soon it was their turn.

They were so happy to hear that Miss Pat would be their home room teacher and their computer instructor even though they would have different teachers for their other subjects.

The “Can Dos” followed Miss Pat to a sun-filled classroom with tables and chairs that were just the right size for them. There were rows of computers in the back of the room and coat closets with lots of room for boots and rain and snow gear come winter.

Then came the fun part. Miss Pat said,”When I call your name, please take the seat I assign you.” The “Can Dos” all hoped to sit next to their best friends, but Miss Pat knew better than that. Sitting next to your best friend would be too much of a temptation to talk.

Soon, everyone had his or her seat. Miss Pat welcomed everyone back to school, took attendance and gave the “Can Dos” their daily schedule of classes and the teachers who would teach them in each class. The class did not have to change rooms for each class, the teachers would come to them.

The day went by fast and soon they were on their way home talking a mile a minute about their new teachers and all the new things they would be learning.

The “Can Dos all agreed that the school year was off to a very good start!

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Bus Manners

Saturday, August 27th, 2016

The “Can Dos were excited to be taking a bus from their town to a neighboring town on a field trip. The “Can Dos” rarely got to ride a city bus as they either walked to school or rode the school bus.

As the “Can Dos” got on the bus, Hector took the seat behind the driver and Bobby sat alongside of him.  When Miss Sue, the camp director, got on the bus she asked Hector and Bobby to give up their seats as they were sitting in a section reserved for riders with disabilities and senior citizens. “But there isn’t anyone sitting her, said Bobby. “That doesn’t mean you should sit there, said Miss Sue. “Read what the sign says, please. “

Hector read out loud so that everyone on the bus could hear. “These seats are reserved for persons with disabilities and the elderly.”

Hector and Bobby joined the other “Can Dos “ taking seats in the middle of the bus. Hector and Bobby made it their business to watch who got on at every stop and where they sat. A lady with a walker got on and sat in the section reserved for people with disabilities. Then an elderly woman with a cane got on and sat in the same reserved section.

At the next stop two teenage boys got on the bus and plopped themselves down in the reserved section. Hector and Bobby got all upset and pointed the two teenage boys out to Miss Sue saying, “Miss Sue, make them move. They don’t belong there!”

Miss Sue smiled and said, “Wait and see what happens.” Just then a man in a wheelchair got on the bus. There was nowhere for him to sit. The teenage boys were sitting on the seats usually lifted up to make room for a wheelchair. The bus driver got up, and in a voice that could be heard  all over the bus said, “Hey there you boys, you know better than to sit there. Get up, move to the back of the bus, and make room for the man and his chair.

The boys turned beet red as everyone on the bus stared at them. They found seats in the back of the bus.

A few stops later, a woman with a preschooler and a baby in her arms got on the bus. There were no seats left; she had to stand. There was a grown man sitting right by where she was standing.  He pretended he didn’t see her, so he would not have to give up his seat. The teens in the back of the bus pretended to be sleeping.

Hector looked at Bobby, they nodded to each other, got up and walked up to the lady. Hector said, ”We have two seats a few rows back you can have. She thanked them and followed them back to where they were sitting.

All the “Can Dos” clapped for Hector and Bobby. Miss Sue gave them a big smile and said, “I am very proud of you both. You practiced good bus manners!”

Hector and Bobby beamed. Hector said, “We learned a lot about bus rules today and about being kind to people who might need extra help when riding a bus.”

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Grandpa John and The Ice Cream Story

Friday, August 19th, 2016

Grandpa John was sweeping in front of his store when some of the “Can Do” kids were coming down the street; he couldn’t help noticing how hot and bored they looked. “Can Do” Street was in the midst of a heat wave. It was too hot to ride bikes, or play ball, or even swim in the pool, since the water was so warm it felt like taking a bath.

Grandpa John Front

Grandpa John decided the “Can Dos” need an ice cream break before they went over to Orrie’s for a play date.

When the “Can Dos” got to his store, Grandpa John invited them in for ice cream cones. When the “Can Dos” were all seated in the air-conditioned store, enjoying their ice cream, Grandpa John asked, “Who can tell me when we first began to eat ice cream in the U.S. A.? Their blank looks told him it was story time…ice cream story time.

Grandpa John cleared his throat and began talking, “Ice cream,  has a long history in the Americas. Some of my Mexican friends have told me that the Aztec emperor Moctezuma (referred to today as Montezuma) had servants climb the snow-capped volcanic mountains for snow to mix with fruit juices as a hot-weather treat.

In 1744 Barbara Janssen Bladen, daughter of Lord Baltimore and wife of Proprietary Colonial Governor of Maryland, Sir Thomas Bladen, first served ice cream in the American colonies. Ice cream, at that time, was a fashion of the rich.

The sweet treat did not become popular in this country until after the American Revolution, when the Americans had continued contact with the French.

Thomas Jefferson learned how to make ice cream during his time in Paris as the United States’ Ambassador to France. He collected many recipes while in France, but ice cream was one of his favorites. Many visitors to Monticello, Jefferson’s home in Virginia, had  ice cream during their meals there.

Americans’ love for ice cream has only increased over the years. Mary Todd Lincoln held berry parties which featured seasonal strawberries and ice cream served on the side. An American named

Abe Doumar is said to have created the first ice cream cone, on July 23, 1904, at the World’s Fair in St. Louis. When he ran out of ice cream dishes to serve his ice cream in, he served the ice cream in rolled-up thin waffles.”

By the time Grandpa John finished his ice cream story, the “Can Dos” were finished their cones and anxious to get to Orrie’s house. Grandpa John packed a cone in a freezer bag for Orrie, and gave it to Willie to carry.

As they walked to Orrie’s, Hector said, “Grandpa John has good stories for everything.” Bobby added, “Yeah, and they sound even better when you’re eating ice cream.” Everyone laughed and agreed that Grandpa John’s stories were best told with ice cream.

History of Ice Cream Source: U.S. Government Printing Office’s (GPO) Government Book Talk

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