Posts Tagged ‘Can Do Kids’

Bike Riding is Fun When We Keep Safe

Sunday, March 26th, 2017

police woman pauls talks about bike riding It was that time again; time for Policewoman Paula to visit all the classes at “Can Do” Street Elementary School, and speak about bike safety.

It was officially spring, although it didn’t feel like spring. Summer couldn’t be far behind. With  warmer weather, the “Can Dos” were looking forward to bike riding every day. Some of them had two wheel bikes and were good at riding them.  Others were still learning to ride a two-wheel bike.

No matter, thought Policewoman Paula, they all need to to know how to be safe when bike riding.

After she thanked Miss Pat for having her, and greeted the “Can Dos” she talked to the children about how much fun bike riding can be if you follow the rules of bike riding and pay attention to what you are doing while riding.

Policewoman Paula spoke to the class about the following bike safety rules:

  • Use a practice track to get really good at bike riding before you ride in the street. A practice area is where you get to apply biking rules in a safe area. A gym or playground with a flat, concrete area works well as a practice biking area.
  • Obey traffic signs. Get to know what traffic signs mean, and have a parent test you before you go out in traffic.
  • Wear a helmet whenever you ride, no matter how short the ride, no matter how hot the day. Make sure your helmet fits well.  Your bike helmet should fit snugly without rocking from side to side. Helmet sizing pads help get the proper fit. The helmet should sit low on the forehead. It should only have about one to two finger-widths between the eyebrow and the helmet.
  • Make sure the bike seat and handlebars are a proper height. You should be able to straddle the bar with both feet flat on the ground with about 2 inches of clearance.
  • Check you bike each time before riding it for  loose chains, low tires, broken spokes and other possible bike dangers.
  • When riding a bike in traffic:
    • Ride in single file and in a straight line on the right-hand side of the road.
    • Make sure your hands are always within reach of the hand brakes.
    • Use hand signals when turning. For a left turn, put your left arm straight out and parallel to the road. For a right turn, bend the elbow of your left arm so that your forearm and biceps form a 90-degree angle.
    • Keep an eye out for potholes, sewer grates, uneven pavement, and soft shoulders. Warn riders behind you by calling out these dangers.
    • Never ride with both hands off the handlebars.
    • When biking, don’t wear headphones (they muffle the sound of approaching vehicles) or pants with flared cuffs (they can get caught in the bicycle’s chain).

      Remember, no night riding; you are 3x more at risk of having a bike  accident at night.

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The Parade

Thursday, March 16th, 2017

There was an air of excitement in the classroom. Tomorrow was the annual parade down “Can Do” Street. It wasn’t just any parade; it was the St. Patrick’s Day Parade!

paradeYundi raised his hand and asked Miss Pat why “Can Do” Street had an annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade. Miss Pat replied, “To celebrate Irish heritage.” Yundi thought for a moment and answered, “Why do we celebrate Irish heritage? Who are the Irish and where do they come from? Are there any Irish in our town?”

“That’s a lot of questions,” said Miss Pat. “Let’s look at the history of the Irish in America for those answers.”

Miss Pat began, “We honor Irish heritage and its rich culture and traditions because so many of our forefathers immigrated from Ireland, a small country in Europe, to the US from early colonial days. They came like most immigrants, for the promise of a better life.

Irish Americans, especially those who arrived in the U.S. in the 1840s, had to overcome much suffering. The Great Potato Famine of 1845-49 claimed the lives of 1 million Irish back in Ireland. To escape starvation, over 500,000 came to America. Most of the Irish who settled in the U.S., during this period, arrived with little education and few material possessions. As a result, they encountered poverty and discrimination. Most were Catholics and also suffered because of longstanding prejudices against their religion.

Irish Americans fought in the Civil War, and all the other major wars ever since. They played a large role in the growth of this nation over the years, in the building trades, law enforcement, politics, and education.

There are 34.5 million Americans who list their heritage as either primarily or partially Irish. Irish is the second-most common ancestry among Americans, falling just behind German. (US Census 2013)

Cities all over the U.S. celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with a parade and other festivities. The most famous of these annual festival traditions includes the Boston parade, with its first parade in 1737; the New York City parade, which began in 1762; and the Savannah, Georgia, parade which started in 1812.”

Miss Pat paused to let everything she said sink in. Then she asked, “Does anyone want to add anything?” All at once, Orrie, Bobby, Annie, Kathy,  and Arthur J raised their hands. Miss Pat called on Orrie, who said, “My grandma and grandpa came to “Can Do” Street, from Ireland, when they were just married.” Kathy jumped in, saying,”My grandma knows how to step dance, which is a special kind of Irish dancing that she did as a child, in Ireland.” Then it was Bobby’s turn, “I’m learning to play the bagpipe; someday I will play it in the parade.”  Arthur J shared, “I have a good voice, so I am learning to sing the Irish songs my grandparents love so much.” Annie, who had been waiting patiently burst out with, “My grandma makes the best Irish Soda bread, and I ‘m going to eat lots of it after the parade!” Everyone giggled at Annie’s comment!

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

parade

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Time Talk

Monday, March 13th, 2017

timeMiss Pat was going around the classroom asking each of the “Can Dos” to look at the clocks in the front of the room and tell her the time.

She soon knew that the class need help learning how to time talk…that is to say what time they see on the clock.

For instance, when the small hand is on the 3 and the big hand is on the 5 what do you say? Do you say twenty-five minutes after three or do you say three twenty-five?

Good thing Miss Pat had made some telling time games on the computer.

So, why not join the “Can Do” kids on the computer and see how you do with telling time?

Just go to the “Can Do” Club House, choose games and choose telling time.

Good Luck!

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Be a Better Reader by Reading to the Dogs

Thursday, March 2nd, 2017

readingCoach Campbell is cleaning up after a rec center intramural game, Bobby is helping. Coach Campbell asks, “So, how is school going? Passing all your classes?”

Bobby answers, “Yeah, but I am almost failing English. I am having a hard time reading out loud. I get all nervous, and I am afraid the other kids will readinglaugh at me. The out loud reading is a big part of the class grade. I want to get better, but I just get so nervous.”

Coach answers, “How about you practice reading out loud? Like part of your homework. Just something you do every day to get better, like practicing basketball made you a better player.”

Bobby asks,But where do I practice? There are always people around me. Plus, I also don’t like being all alone.”

Coach Campbell answers, “What if there was a place where I could guarantee not a single person would be around to hear you reading aloud, or laugh at you, and, you wouldn’t be lonely? Would that work?” Bobby says, “Yeah, sure – but, where is that place?”

Coach Campbell says, “The local animal shelter. You can sit and read to the dogs all day long if you want. You can read the same sentence again and again if you need to, the dogs won’t mind. They will be happy for the company.”

Bobby answers,Wow, that sounds cool. Yeah, let’s go THERE!”

     reading       

Story by: Ned Campbell (voice of Coach Campbell, “Can Do” Street),  teacher and wrestling coach in Brooklyn, NY

 

Parent Note: For more information about children reading to dogs, check out:

  • Children read aloud to dogs

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/children-read-aloud-to-dogs/2012/12/27/9cc2a34a-4c55-11e2-8758-b64a2997a921_story.html?utm_term=.99fd7bf7b55e

A growing number of libraries and some schools in the region are inviting volunteers to bring their dogs in to help children learn, hoping the pets will calm children who are struggling, excite those who are bored, and help kids equate reading with fun.

  • Children ‘Deck the Howls’ at shelter’s reading to dogs holiday event

http://www.ajc.com/lifestyles/pets/children-deck-the-howls-shelter-reading-dogs-holiday-event/XU04wvCcDMTdw4AFw0J7pK/

This is open to children ages 5-11 who wanted to come to the shelter and read holiday stories to the adoptable dogs. According to the shelter’s YouTube page, the kids made toys, treats and pillows at the event, and helped tuck the dogs in for the night.

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The Field Trip

Thursday, February 23rd, 2017

field trip

Sometimes you need to take the “Can Dos” on a field trip thought Miss Sue, the recreation center director.

The “Can Dos” were bored, bored, bored! It was the first day of winter recess; it was too cold to play outside. The snow and ice piles behind the recreation center were taller than them and were blocking them from riding their sleds down the best hill for sledding in all of “Can Do” Street. The ice skating rink was covered with snow and off limits.

They were tired of playing games in the recreation center gym. Even Annie was tired of shooting baskets! They had been having play dates with each other since Thursday, and they were starting to squabble with one another.

Miss Sue was running out of ideas on how to keep them busy. When she saw Grandpa Dooley in the music room, she went in and asked for his advice. “The Can Dos” are feeling all cooped up. They are not interested in any more board games, or playing basketball or volleyball in the gym tomorrow. How about a field trip, but where to go in winter?”

“Hmmm,” said Grandpa Dooley. “How much money do we have in the budget for a field trip?” Miss Sue answered,  “We canceled a trip because of the weather so far. We can afford a field trip. What do you have in mind?” Grandpa smiled, “Just leave it to me,” he said. “You call the parents and get their permission for the trip. Tell them we have a field trip planned for tomorrow, and it’s a surprise. Ask them to hide their Can Do’s bathing suit and a towel in his or her bag”.

The next day dawned cold and clear. It was perfect weather for a field trip. When the “Can Dos” arrived at the rec center they were told to keep their coats and hats on and line up outside for a surprise field trip. Hector wanted to know where they were going. Kathy called out, “What are we going to do?”

When the bus pulled out, and the rec center faded from view, Grandpa Dooley announced their destination. They were spending the day at the Boy Scout Camp in the next town. Some of their parents would meet the bus there to help with the day’s activities.

The “Can Dos” looked at each other and then exploded with questions. The first question Grandpa Dooley heard, over all the yelling, was from Hector. “What’s so good about going on a field trip where we have to be indoors at the Boy Scout Camp?”

Grandpa chuckled. How does a horse-drawn sleigh ride through the woods, followed by swimming in a heated pool, followed by lunch around the fireplace with storytelling sound to you?”

First there was silence and looks of amazement, and then the “Can Dos” broke out with a roar of cheering about the field trip.

 

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