June 16th, 2016

germsMiss Pat noticed that Hector came in from recess with dirty hands and an open snack, which he continued to eat with his dirty hands. Oh no, thought Miss Pat, all those germs going into his mouth!

Before Miss Pat could speak to him, he scooped some snack with his hands and gave it to Willie, who put it in his mouth.

UGH, thought Miss Pat. No matter how many times I talk to them about when and why it is important to wash their hands…they forget. They forget about how germs are spread.

I know, she thought, it is time to visit the US Center for Disease Control, CDC, website that has a great graphic showing children how germs are spread.

Miss Pat called the class to order and asked everyone to focus on the White Board. Then she clicked on:

Dont Hand Those Germs to Me

The “Can Dos” stared at the graphic from the CDC. They couldn’t believe their eyes! It was so easy just to hand germs to others! It was also so easy to get germs from others who did wash their hands often.

The class got quiet. Then Hector and a few others raised their hands and asked to go wash their hands.

Great, thought Miss Pat. They got the message from the CDC graphic…it is so easy to spread germs!

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June 8th, 2016

flag

June 14-Flag Day!  Let’s celebrate our flag flying 239 years!

Our flag is one of our most important national symbols.

On June 14, 1777, the Second Continental Congress passed the Flag Resolution, which said that the flag would be made up of thirteen alternating red and white stripes and thirteen white, five-pointed stars on a blue field. Stars have been added to the flag as new states join the Union.

The flag has 13 horizontal stripes that stand for the 13 original colonies; seven are red, and six are white. In the upper left corner there are 50 white stars on a blue background; these stand for the 50 states in our United States. The 50-star flag we use today dates from July 4, 1960, after Hawaii became the fiftieth state, but stars were added in the past as new states joined the Union.

Images of the United States flag can be seen in many places: flying from flagpoles of public buildings, flown from private homes during Flag Day and Federal holidays such as Independence Day, and worn as a lapel pin, among many others. The flag is also referred to by other names including the Stars and Stripes, Old Glory, and the Star-Spangled Banner.

Since 1916, Flag Day in the United States has been officially celebrated on June 14. Title 4, Section 6 of the United States Code (4 U.S.C. 6) has the official information on the flag, including the standard proportions, rules to observe when displaying the flag, and how to treat this national symbol properly.

American Flag Facts and Figures:

  • When Kentucky and Vermont were admitted to the Union, the flag expanded to 15 stars and 15 stripes, but was later changed back to 13 when it became clear that adding a stripe for each state would make the flag unmanageable.
  • The official first flag to have the present design with 50 stars was flown at Fort McHenry National Monument at 12:01 a.m in Baltimore, Maryland, on July 4, 1960.

Source: Kids.gov

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June 1st, 2016

The “Can Dos” came back from Memorial Day weekend with their heads full of what they want to do come summer vacation.

Miss Pat knew they would.

The “Can Dos” are not fond of the times tables.

Since Miss Pat knows they are important,  she made up two games using the times tables for the class to play.

Why not play along?

Just go to the “Can Do”Club House, choose games and them choose the games called x+1.

Good luck!

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May 25th, 2016
Wrinkles

Hector looked at Grandma Hattie and asked, “Grandma Hattie, why do grandmas have wrinkles?”

Willie glared at Hector and said, “That’s not a nice question to ask, Hector.” Hector got red in the face and answered, “I didn’t mean anything by it, Willie. It’s just that every grandma I know has wrinkles on her face.”

Grandma Hattie smiled and said, “It’s okay Willie. I don’t mind answering Hector’s question. It’s a fair question.”

“Well, said Grandma Hattie, There is the answer that talks about our skin aging as we get older, but I’d rather tell you my way of thinking about wrinkles. I think wrinkles are actually wisdom lines that appear in our faces as we grow older and  get wiser and wiser.”

Orrie asked, “What kind of wisdom makes lines”? Grandma smiled and said, “Well, there is the wisdom that comes from learning about living through hard work, raising children, loving family and friends, and getting through tough times.”

Hector looked thoughtful and asked, “How come I don’t have any wrinkles”? Everyone laughed and grandma answered, “You are still very young. You are just learning about life. Your wrinkles will come when you get older.”

Everyone grew quiet. Then Willie asked,”Grandma, do you mind having wrinkles?’

Grandma Hattie gave her big grandma grin and answered, “No, I don’t. My  wrinkles say that I am a wise woman, a woman that can help younger people, like you three, to live well and that’s my gift to share”

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May 18th, 2016

responsibility Coach Campbell, Bobby and his sister, Kathy, and some other “Can Dos” are at the “Can Do” Center, working in the storage room, getting out the volleyballs and net to use in the summer camp.

 “OK now guys, let’s pay attention. Be careful, this is not that big a room and we have a lot of stuff to get out.”

 Suddenly, Coach Campbell hears a Can Do kid yell, “OUCH – Hey that hurt!” and then “Yeah, well it’s not my fault!!”

 Kathy comes up to Coach Campbell and lets him know that Bobby hit her, for no reason, just hit her with his fist.

 Coach Campbell takes Bobby aside to talk to him in private about what just happened.responsibility

 Before he can even ask the first question, Bobby says, “It is not my fault, I got mad and when I get mad, well, I just lose it. That’s just the way it is.”

 Really? asks Coach Campbell. Nothing you can do about it, huh?

 “Nope -nothing.”

 OK, let me ask you some questions then, and maybe we can get you to see this a bit differently. OK? Given that I was standing as close to you as I was, why did you hit her, and not me? I was there, and you just had to hit something, why not me?

 “You are big, and would probably crush me if I hit you.”

 So then, you chose to hit Kathy and not me. Right?

 “Yeah.”

 So if you can make a decision, make a choice, then you really have not lost control, have you?

 “I guess not.”

 That’s right. You hit her because you could, because you though you could get away with it. That was a decision you made and that means you are responsible for hitting her.  Now, let me ask you another question. What if, just imagine, what if, I got mad and decided to haul off and hit you. Would that be OK, because, you know, I was mad.

 ’NO! No way Coach!”

 Well, why not?

 “Well, you are bigger than me, and stronger, it would hurt a lot.”

 That’s why you wouldn’t WANT me to hit you…but I asked you if it would be OK to hit you, because – like you said – I was mad.

 “No, it would not be OK for you to hit me.”

 Well, if it isn’t OK for me to hit you, then how can it be OK for you to hit Kathy… right?

 “Yeah, you’re right. What is wrong is wrong.”

 So, now what are you going to do?

 “I am going to say I am sorry to Kathy and tell her I will never do it again.

 We all get mad at times. But, hitting someone is not the way to deal with it. Most of the time, the anger can pass over quickly, other times you need to talk things out, but getting violent is not going to help. If you do get violent, remember – that was your choice and you have to take responsibility for it.

 

responsibility Story by: Ned Campbell, a coach and teacher in Brooklyn, NY.  He is the voice of  Coach Campbell in the “Can Do” Street programs.

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